Rush Limbaugh, losing his fight with lung cancer, vows to keep fighting the left

Rush Limbaugh recently told his large and loving radio audience that he is losing his battle with lung cancer and that his days are numbered.

Upon hearing that Limbaugh had been diagnosed with Stage IV lung cancer this past February, I feared that that battle might already be lost.  Stage IV indicates that multiple metastases have occurred, that the malignant cancer horse has left the barn big-time.

While chemotherapy does target cancer cells throughout the body, the chemo for Stage IV lung cancer is brutal and gradually becomes a danger in its own right.  The average survival time after diagnosis is less than a year.

Rush knew all this.  He's a smart man and undoubtedly sought out the best doctors and hospitals.  Plus the best oncologists have a way of getting right to the point.  So Rush knew.

He faced a dilemma that many before him have faced: what do I do with my remaining days?

In the movies, folks of a certain age, faced with their imminent demise, go on adventures.  They work on their bucket list.  Even more improbably, they fall in love; become buddies with fellow cancer sufferers; or do something heroic, knowing their ticket's about to be punched anyway.

Real life, sadly, is not so thrilling.

Among other things, the terminal cancer patient is pretty sick in real life.  And if he's not ill from the disease at any given moment, he's recovering from the most recent surgery, bout of chemotherapy, or radiation treatment — not to mention suffering side-effects from his pain meds, yet another difficult menu to navigate.

So what's a person to do, faced with a failing body and the hours in his life ticking away?

A mega-millionaire like Rush Limbaugh could have easily retreated from public life and set up the finest and most personalized hospice care in his own home.  His wealth substantial, his legacy assured, and his fame enormous, he could have quietly — and privately — sailed off into the sunset.

But Rush Limbaugh chose to go down fighting.  He's done as many broadcasts as he possibly could since his diagnosis, fighting like hell to get behind the golden EIB microphone.  He promises to continue educating the world on the insidious dangers of liberalism for as long as he can.

Rush Limbaugh loves America, always has.  He's literally going to spend his last breaths trying to get President Trump re-elected, trying to protect our Constitution, and trying to keep his fellow Americans free from the tyranny of the left.  We owe him a tremendous debt of gratitude.

I am praying hard for Rush to stay with us until President Trump's landslide re-election.  Rush deserves that much.

Rush Limbaugh recently told his large and loving radio audience that he is losing his battle with lung cancer and that his days are numbered.

Upon hearing that Limbaugh had been diagnosed with Stage IV lung cancer this past February, I feared that that battle might already be lost.  Stage IV indicates that multiple metastases have occurred, that the malignant cancer horse has left the barn big-time.

While chemotherapy does target cancer cells throughout the body, the chemo for Stage IV lung cancer is brutal and gradually becomes a danger in its own right.  The average survival time after diagnosis is less than a year.

Rush knew all this.  He's a smart man and undoubtedly sought out the best doctors and hospitals.  Plus the best oncologists have a way of getting right to the point.  So Rush knew.

He faced a dilemma that many before him have faced: what do I do with my remaining days?

In the movies, folks of a certain age, faced with their imminent demise, go on adventures.  They work on their bucket list.  Even more improbably, they fall in love; become buddies with fellow cancer sufferers; or do something heroic, knowing their ticket's about to be punched anyway.

Real life, sadly, is not so thrilling.

Among other things, the terminal cancer patient is pretty sick in real life.  And if he's not ill from the disease at any given moment, he's recovering from the most recent surgery, bout of chemotherapy, or radiation treatment — not to mention suffering side-effects from his pain meds, yet another difficult menu to navigate.

So what's a person to do, faced with a failing body and the hours in his life ticking away?

A mega-millionaire like Rush Limbaugh could have easily retreated from public life and set up the finest and most personalized hospice care in his own home.  His wealth substantial, his legacy assured, and his fame enormous, he could have quietly — and privately — sailed off into the sunset.

But Rush Limbaugh chose to go down fighting.  He's done as many broadcasts as he possibly could since his diagnosis, fighting like hell to get behind the golden EIB microphone.  He promises to continue educating the world on the insidious dangers of liberalism for as long as he can.

Rush Limbaugh loves America, always has.  He's literally going to spend his last breaths trying to get President Trump re-elected, trying to protect our Constitution, and trying to keep his fellow Americans free from the tyranny of the left.  We owe him a tremendous debt of gratitude.

I am praying hard for Rush to stay with us until President Trump's landslide re-election.  Rush deserves that much.