Rudy Giuliani lays out the case against Joe Biden

We’ve long known that Joe Biden made sure that his family profited from his time in politics. He was just “good ole Joe” while they were raking in millions of dollars. It seemed strangely altruistic. However, what we’ve learned from only the small release of information on the Hunter Biden computer and Tony Bobulinski’s statements, is that Joe Biden wasn’t just a benevolent corrupt politician – he was on the take, using his family as middlemen.

Of course, the story is complicated. If it had been simple, Biden would have been run out of politics a long time ago, even by his fellow Democrats. I know Rudy Giuliani has expounded on the information in various interviews and his video channel. However, most interviews are too short, and I find his podcasts a little too long and detailed because each episode breaks things down issue-by-issue.

As far as I’m concerned, Giuliani’s best prosecutorial narration shows up on an interview he did with Dan Bongino on Thursday. Bongino gives him all the time he needs to make the case but also asks the right questions to elucidate issues that may be confusing and to give a bit more structure to the narrative:

Also, there are two other excellent interviews on the video, with Robert Cahaly of the Trafalgar Group and Steve Cortes.

The Cahaly interview is the right length to give a strong overview without drowning the listener in detail. The gist of the Cahaly segment is that Trump is making a strong showing in states he needs to win.

As in 2016, Trump is again bringing out people who don’t ordinarily vote. Even better, it appears that these people, if they make an effort to vote, will also vote for down-ballot Republican candidates. This is good news for Republicans such as Martha McSally, who are in very close races. There’s a bit of a flip in Michigan: John James is such a strong candidate for the Senate that Trump might benefit from his coattails.

Trump’s campaign spokesman, Steve Cortes, makes similar points, except that he’s speaking from inside the campaign. It’s all very interesting

Most of you have figured out that I’m a big Dan Bongino fan. He is extremely good at simplifying complex factual situations without dumbing them down. This means he’s also a good interviewer because he asks the questions ordinary people would want to ask to understand the person he’s interviewing.

So, if you want a powerful overview of how deeply wrong Biden’s conduct was, listen to the interview with Giuliani. If you want to understand why the big polling companies are almost certainly as wrong this time as they were in 2016, listen to Robert Cahaly. And if you want to understand why Trump’s going around with a smile lately, listen to Steve Cortes.

Postscript: For another excellent overview, I suggest the Manhattan Contrarian’s article, “Biden Corruption: Trickle Of Information Becomes Flow Becomes Flood Becomes Avalanche.”

Image: Dan Bongino interviews Rudy Giuliani. Rumble screengrab.

We’ve long known that Joe Biden made sure that his family profited from his time in politics. He was just “good ole Joe” while they were raking in millions of dollars. It seemed strangely altruistic. However, what we’ve learned from only the small release of information on the Hunter Biden computer and Tony Bobulinski’s statements, is that Joe Biden wasn’t just a benevolent corrupt politician – he was on the take, using his family as middlemen.

Of course, the story is complicated. If it had been simple, Biden would have been run out of politics a long time ago, even by his fellow Democrats. I know Rudy Giuliani has expounded on the information in various interviews and his video channel. However, most interviews are too short, and I find his podcasts a little too long and detailed because each episode breaks things down issue-by-issue.

As far as I’m concerned, Giuliani’s best prosecutorial narration shows up on an interview he did with Dan Bongino on Thursday. Bongino gives him all the time he needs to make the case but also asks the right questions to elucidate issues that may be confusing and to give a bit more structure to the narrative:

Also, there are two other excellent interviews on the video, with Robert Cahaly of the Trafalgar Group and Steve Cortes.

The Cahaly interview is the right length to give a strong overview without drowning the listener in detail. The gist of the Cahaly segment is that Trump is making a strong showing in states he needs to win.

As in 2016, Trump is again bringing out people who don’t ordinarily vote. Even better, it appears that these people, if they make an effort to vote, will also vote for down-ballot Republican candidates. This is good news for Republicans such as Martha McSally, who are in very close races. There’s a bit of a flip in Michigan: John James is such a strong candidate for the Senate that Trump might benefit from his coattails.

Trump’s campaign spokesman, Steve Cortes, makes similar points, except that he’s speaking from inside the campaign. It’s all very interesting

Most of you have figured out that I’m a big Dan Bongino fan. He is extremely good at simplifying complex factual situations without dumbing them down. This means he’s also a good interviewer because he asks the questions ordinary people would want to ask to understand the person he’s interviewing.

So, if you want a powerful overview of how deeply wrong Biden’s conduct was, listen to the interview with Giuliani. If you want to understand why the big polling companies are almost certainly as wrong this time as they were in 2016, listen to Robert Cahaly. And if you want to understand why Trump’s going around with a smile lately, listen to Steve Cortes.

Postscript: For another excellent overview, I suggest the Manhattan Contrarian’s article, “Biden Corruption: Trickle Of Information Becomes Flow Becomes Flood Becomes Avalanche.”

Image: Dan Bongino interviews Rudy Giuliani. Rumble screengrab.