Media ghouls circle President Trump, slavering for his demise

Well, the ghouls are out early this sunny October, encircling President Trump as he recovers from COVID, openly slavering for his death.

The first whiff of this new wave of wishful thinking came from a tweet noted by American Thinker contributor Taylor Day and retweeted by Twitter big James Woods:

The obnoxious statement from some reporter in the White House press pool, attending a medical briefing, which contained good news about President Trump's response to medical treatment, was naked evidence that she liked only bad news for the health of President Trump.  Exhibit A of the "wish he was dead" bunch.

Then the big three print news organizations — the Washington Post, the New York Times, and the Los Angeles Times — each dispatched their top talent from the trenches to update President Trump's obituary, a job that's normally fobbed off to reporters as punishment duty. Gotta be ready for the big event, they reasoned.

Hank Berrien at Daily Wire has that story:

According to The New York Times' Ben Smith, top reporters at three of the major newspapers in the nation, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Los Angeles Times, have been assigned to update President Donald Trump's obituary.

Those reporters include Peter Baker at The New York Times, Marc Fisher at The Washington Post and Mark Z. Barabak at The Los Angeles Times, Smith claimed people from the various papers confirmed to him.

No reports so far of reporters complaining.  Odds are good they might have asked for the assignment, too.  After all, top editors don't like to make top reporters angry by dispatching them to obituary duty against their will.  But in this case, things seem to be seen a bit differently.

Trump, though, isn't anywhere near dying.

Yes, he's in a high risk group.  And COVID can be unpredictable.  But it's also true that Trump has a robust constitution and is getting the best in medical care.  The odds that he's going to die are very low, certainly lower than that of U.K. prime minister Boris Johnson, who nevertheless pulled through, though it was a close call.  All the same, COVID death rates have plummeted in the U.S., with Trump's age group having about a 5% chance of hospitalization and an even lower chance of death.

The obituary-writing thing, leaked to a columnist at the Times, who printed it, sounds like something the papers wanted to get out.  They normally are more circumspect about who has what assignment.  The idea was to wish political death on Trump by getting word out that Trump is a goner.  Yet they were also slavering for his death.

Rest assured: we know what they think of President Trump.  The only question now is how many more incidents like these will be coming.

Image credit: Pixabay public domain.

Well, the ghouls are out early this sunny October, encircling President Trump as he recovers from COVID, openly slavering for his death.

The first whiff of this new wave of wishful thinking came from a tweet noted by American Thinker contributor Taylor Day and retweeted by Twitter big James Woods:

The obnoxious statement from some reporter in the White House press pool, attending a medical briefing, which contained good news about President Trump's response to medical treatment, was naked evidence that she liked only bad news for the health of President Trump.  Exhibit A of the "wish he was dead" bunch.

Then the big three print news organizations — the Washington Post, the New York Times, and the Los Angeles Times — each dispatched their top talent from the trenches to update President Trump's obituary, a job that's normally fobbed off to reporters as punishment duty. Gotta be ready for the big event, they reasoned.

Hank Berrien at Daily Wire has that story:

According to The New York Times' Ben Smith, top reporters at three of the major newspapers in the nation, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Los Angeles Times, have been assigned to update President Donald Trump's obituary.

Those reporters include Peter Baker at The New York Times, Marc Fisher at The Washington Post and Mark Z. Barabak at The Los Angeles Times, Smith claimed people from the various papers confirmed to him.

No reports so far of reporters complaining.  Odds are good they might have asked for the assignment, too.  After all, top editors don't like to make top reporters angry by dispatching them to obituary duty against their will.  But in this case, things seem to be seen a bit differently.

Trump, though, isn't anywhere near dying.

Yes, he's in a high risk group.  And COVID can be unpredictable.  But it's also true that Trump has a robust constitution and is getting the best in medical care.  The odds that he's going to die are very low, certainly lower than that of U.K. prime minister Boris Johnson, who nevertheless pulled through, though it was a close call.  All the same, COVID death rates have plummeted in the U.S., with Trump's age group having about a 5% chance of hospitalization and an even lower chance of death.

The obituary-writing thing, leaked to a columnist at the Times, who printed it, sounds like something the papers wanted to get out.  They normally are more circumspect about who has what assignment.  The idea was to wish political death on Trump by getting word out that Trump is a goner.  Yet they were also slavering for his death.

Rest assured: we know what they think of President Trump.  The only question now is how many more incidents like these will be coming.

Image credit: Pixabay public domain.