Why should Ruth Bader Ginsburg's dying words choose the next SCOTUS justice?

Having shown repeatedly that they are soulless — standing idly by while America burns and people die, Democrats are now revealing conclusively that their brains are bereft of original thought.  Their presidential nominee, Joe Biden, hides in his basement bunker, emerging occasionally to answer preset questions, or campaigns on future promises that President Trump has already accomplished.  What a copycat.

Democrats resemble the broken down, hapless players of Vegas or Atlantic City, desperately begging, borrowing, and pawning anything they can grasp for one more play — the one they believe will be the winner and save everything.  Alas, that big win just isn't going to happen.

AOC, with her bellowing rhinoceros mouth and peanut-sized brain, stares mournfully into the camera she loves, disconsolately lamenting a purported "dying lady's wish."  While Justice RBG did muse over her replacement while alive, whatever she said with her last breaths is irrelevant — and it's terribly insensitive to utilized it in this manner.

Naturally, the ever bellicose Schumer has joined the fray.  Everything is on the table, he threatens as Hillary pops up, like the monster from the swamp, admonishing Biden not to concede under any circumstances.

Risibly, if it weren't so dangerous, is their latest naked scam to attempt to insert a "dying declaration" — an evidentiary exception for producing "hearsay evidence" at a trial — into the Supreme Court nominating process.  Nice try.  A dying declaration may be admitted at trial, because there exists an underlying belief (correct or not) that a person about to die, fearing what exists after his death, is afraid to lie.

There is nothing extant, in current law governing the nomination and approval of a Supreme Court candidate, that includes a dying declaration or the wishes, however much anyone might love or admire her, of a dying lady.