Somewhat optimistic about the Abraham Accords

The wild optimism that greeted the oh, so public handshake for peace on the White House lawn between the PLO's Yasser Arafat, no peace be upon him, and Israel's Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, of blessed memory, with a beaming President Bill Clinton (D) in the middle, 27 years ago; the wild optimism that greeted the Camp David Accords, facilitated by President Jimmy Carter (D) between Egypt's President Anwar Sadat, now deceased, and Israel's Prime Minister Menachem Begin, of blessed memory, 41 years ago; the wild optimism that greeted the Israel-Jordan Peace Treaty signed by Jordan's late Prime Minister Abdul-Salam Majali and Yitzhak Rabin 26 years ago also during the Clinton presidency; and the harsh reality that followed each of these events dampen slightly my wild optimism — oh, how I want to believe — about the results of the Abraham Accords signed on the White House lawn between Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and the Persian Gulf States that constitute the United Arab Emirates, represented by minister of foreign affairs of Bahrain Abdullatif bin Rashid Al-Zayani and minister of foreign affairs for the United Arab Emirates Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyani.  And, of course, the United States' President Donald J. Trump (R).

However, while the former agreement wasn't worth the ink wasted, as Arafat never had any intention of upholding any letter of it, the two treaties between Israel and Egypt and Israel and Jordan, two countries that share borders with Israel, are still in force — and enforced by all parties, though it is a cold peace.  But a cold peace is better than a hot war so my optimism remains.  And the United Arab Emirates are in the Persian (sic) Gulf; they do not border Israel, Egypt, or Jordan.  Optimism, not wild optimism.

Others, with more experience and background, share my muted optimism.  Caroline Glick, an American who has lived in Israel for many years, where she is a political analyst, notes

The US-brokered peace deal between Israel and the United Arab Emirates, which is scheduled to be finalized next week at the White House, strikes a major blow to the twin forces of Islamic imperialism and terror in the Middle East: the Sunni Muslim Brotherhood and the Shiite regime in Iran.  The tripartite alliance between the US, Israel, and the UAE openly supported by Saudi Arabia, Oman, Bahrain, Sudan, and Morocco, gives an institutional structure to a pro-American regional bloc of moderate, anti-jihadist governments all with proven track records of action against the Muslim Brotherhood, Iran and their surrogates.

Based as it is on shared interests, the Israel-UAE alliance is likely to persevere in the years to come.  But America's continued participation in the alliance is significantly tied to the outcome of the presidential elections.

Hmm, "tied to the outcome of the presidential elections."  Hmm, so a President Biden (D) — gag! — or a President Harris (D) — double-gag! — might not honor a treaty signed by their predecessor in the name of the United States.

So I'm still not wildly optimistic.  But optimistic.  Hopefully in oh, say, five years, that optimism will be validated.  Then maybe I can feel wildly optimistic. 

The wild optimism that greeted the oh, so public handshake for peace on the White House lawn between the PLO's Yasser Arafat, no peace be upon him, and Israel's Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, of blessed memory, with a beaming President Bill Clinton (D) in the middle, 27 years ago; the wild optimism that greeted the Camp David Accords, facilitated by President Jimmy Carter (D) between Egypt's President Anwar Sadat, now deceased, and Israel's Prime Minister Menachem Begin, of blessed memory, 41 years ago; the wild optimism that greeted the Israel-Jordan Peace Treaty signed by Jordan's late Prime Minister Abdul-Salam Majali and Yitzhak Rabin 26 years ago also during the Clinton presidency; and the harsh reality that followed each of these events dampen slightly my wild optimism — oh, how I want to believe — about the results of the Abraham Accords signed on the White House lawn between Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and the Persian Gulf States that constitute the United Arab Emirates, represented by minister of foreign affairs of Bahrain Abdullatif bin Rashid Al-Zayani and minister of foreign affairs for the United Arab Emirates Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyani.  And, of course, the United States' President Donald J. Trump (R).

However, while the former agreement wasn't worth the ink wasted, as Arafat never had any intention of upholding any letter of it, the two treaties between Israel and Egypt and Israel and Jordan, two countries that share borders with Israel, are still in force — and enforced by all parties, though it is a cold peace.  But a cold peace is better than a hot war so my optimism remains.  And the United Arab Emirates are in the Persian (sic) Gulf; they do not border Israel, Egypt, or Jordan.  Optimism, not wild optimism.

Others, with more experience and background, share my muted optimism.  Caroline Glick, an American who has lived in Israel for many years, where she is a political analyst, notes

The US-brokered peace deal between Israel and the United Arab Emirates, which is scheduled to be finalized next week at the White House, strikes a major blow to the twin forces of Islamic imperialism and terror in the Middle East: the Sunni Muslim Brotherhood and the Shiite regime in Iran.  The tripartite alliance between the US, Israel, and the UAE openly supported by Saudi Arabia, Oman, Bahrain, Sudan, and Morocco, gives an institutional structure to a pro-American regional bloc of moderate, anti-jihadist governments all with proven track records of action against the Muslim Brotherhood, Iran and their surrogates.

Based as it is on shared interests, the Israel-UAE alliance is likely to persevere in the years to come.  But America's continued participation in the alliance is significantly tied to the outcome of the presidential elections.

Hmm, "tied to the outcome of the presidential elections."  Hmm, so a President Biden (D) — gag! — or a President Harris (D) — double-gag! — might not honor a treaty signed by their predecessor in the name of the United States.

So I'm still not wildly optimistic.  But optimistic.  Hopefully in oh, say, five years, that optimism will be validated.  Then maybe I can feel wildly optimistic.