When the fattest pig in the sty wants you to pay for its extra helpings...

For conservatives, there's always a comfort of sorts in knowing that when it comes to any variety of socialism, anything that can't go on won't.  Socialism is inherently unsustainable, always requiring a sugar daddy to pay its bills after all the money runs out.  It always works, as Lady Thatcher put it, until you run out of other people's money.

This brings us to the municipality of Washington, D.C., which is going to see a vote for statehood in the House Friday but still wants Momma Government to take care of it like a prodigal toddler.

According to John Solomon's JustTheNews:

Like most other American cities, the District is required to balance its budget annually. This year, due to the coronavirus pandemic, city officials are claiming a $1.5 billion budget deficit and asking Congress for $3.15 billion over two years to alleviate the city's financials woes.

The Heroes Act, which passed through the lower chamber last month, allocates more money to Washington, D.C. than to several U.S. states. But according to a new report by Open the Books' Adam Andrzjewski, D.C. city employees are routinely paid (often significantly) higher salaries than their state and federal government counterparts.

Several Democratic entities are looking for bailouts in the upcoming second stimulus package.  Michigan, whose governor, Gretchen Whitmer, banned sales of garden seeds and wondered why its economy withered, is one.  California, led by far-left extremist Gavin Newsom, is rubbing its hands together for more, too.  Here a bil, there a bil, just a few billion, a number that looks small compared to the entire size of the contemplated bailout, which means asking for it is easier.

But the fattest pig at this trough, one that lives way better than the rest of us, is Washington, D.C.

According to Solomon:

The mayor of the capital, for instance, is paid $220,000 annually, which tops the salary of any state governor. Moreover, there are at least six other employees in Mayor Bowser's office who earn more than any governor.

D.C. City Council members make roughly $141,282 per year, which is more than what's paid to members of any state legislature in the country. And the chairman of the D.C. city council, Philip Mendelson, takes home $210,000 per year, which tops the pay for every member of the U.S. Congress, except House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's $223,500.

The chief of the Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) makes $273,156 annually, a higher salary than any four-star general in the United States military makes. Open the Books identifies seven MPD officials making more, often much more, than the U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security ($179,700).

And Solomon's list goes on and on.

It calls to light that bailouts are no longer the bailouts of old. No wake up calls to reform, no International Monetary Fund "austerity" plans, premised on strict conditionalities and reforms to cut fat and enact sound, sustainable fiscal policies so that bailout will never be required again.

In the U.S., bailouts are mammon-grabs, with their blue-city and blue-state denizens demanding the rest of us pay for their binge spending, bloated bureaucracies, and wealthy lifestyles with zero reform on their parts.  Now that people are fleeing the cities due to crime and urban failure, such cities' tax bases are all going to take a hit, and their fat-cat lifestyles are about to implode for lack of money.  They'll be the first with their hands out for money, as the D.C. example shows.

You do all the work; they get all the power and money.  And fat bureaucracies mean never having to say one is sorry.

This has got to stop in Congress.  If the House and Senate can't agree on not bailing out profligates, the bailout demands will be much bigger by the time Washington, D.C. blows through its first pile and holds its hand out again.  Even communist Cuba never had it this good.

It's time for Congress to take a stand and put a stop to these endless-summer blue bailouts.  Let them experience some wipeouts.

Image credit: Pixabay public domain.