A Norma McCorvey documentary lets another reporter flaunt her ignorance

Norma McCorvey was the "Roe" in Roe v. Wade, the case that found the emanations and penumbras that made abortion a constitutional right.  She was a sad woman.  When she was 13, her father abandoned the family, and her mother, a violent alcoholic, raised McCorvey and her older brother.

By age 11, McCorvey had ended up in a State School for Girls.  At 15, when she left the school, a relative raped her repeatedly.  By 1969, McCorvey had been married, divorced, had two children, developed a serious alcohol and drug problem, and become a lesbian.  This was the troubled woman who, when she became pregnant with her third child, moved to the center of the American abortion debate.  McCorvey eventually worked at an abortion facility.

In 1995, McCorvey publicly converted to Evangelical Christianity, quit the abortion facility, and announced that she was henceforth working with Operation Rescue, an anti-abortion organization.  Eventually, McCorvey converted to Catholicism.  She continued to work against abortion for the rest of her life, which ended in 2017, after a serious decline from heart failure.

The Daily Beast wrote the other day that a new documentary, AKA Jane Roe, shows footage of McCorvey purportedly confessing that her anti-abortion stance was "all an act" that she did for money.  "I was the big fish.  I think it was a mutual thing.  I took their money and they'd put me out in front of the cameras and tell me what to say.  That's what I'd say.  If a young woman wants to have an abortion, that's no skin off my ass.  That's why they call it choice."

Matt Walsh discusses why there's reason to be skeptical about both McCorvey's purported confession, as well as statements from those supporting her.  Tyler O'Neil believes that the documentary-makers may have lied to or manipulated the ailing McCorvey.

This post will not rehash those issues.  Instead, this post looks at Laura Bassett's GQ article arguing that the anti-abortion position has always been a right-wing Christian attack on blacks.  The article made headlines on Thursday because Bassett tried to support her argument by claiming that segregationist George Wallace was a Republican.  It was a stupid error (since corrected) and typical of a leftist journalist.  That's not what this post is about, either.

This post targets Bassett's bizarre leftist narrative that being pro-life means you're such a racist Christian that you want black babies not to die.  According to Bassett, conservative racists were pro-abortion up until Roe v. Wade.  They switched sides then because the moral majority used abortion as a way to entice pro-life (but still racist) Christians to become Republicans.

Margaret Sanger, who founded Planned Parenthood, is the saintly godmother of abortion in America.  Sanger, a race- and sex-obsessed socialist, was a member in good standing of the early 20th-century American progressive movement, a Democrat socialist movement that is the direct ancestor of today's Democrat progressives.  She was at home with the progressives of the era, who were also obsessed with racial purity, so much so that Hitler looked to American racial laws as his template for Germany's racial laws.

While Sanger did believe in freeing women from the burden of pregnancy, she was fully on board with race-based eugenics:

Sanger associated with racists and anti-Semites, people who despised everyone who was not a Nordic god or goddess, and those who demanded coercive eugenics programs to eliminate "lesser" humans. 

[snip]

Margaret Sanger's journal was primarily devoted to the legalization and spread of voluntary birth control.  However, the main theme running through The Birth Control Review was eugenics, thus the masthead "Birth Control:  To Create a Race of Thoroughbreds."

One of the most enthusiastic supporters of eugenics in the pages of The Birth Control Review was Professor Doktor Ernst Rudin, Adolf Hitler's Director of Genetic Sterilization and founder of the Nazi Gesellschaft fur Rassenhygiene [Society for Racial Hygiene]. [Citation omitted.] In fact, Rudin's boss, Adolf Hitler, avidly read American eugenics journals and developed his ideas of an Aryan "master race" from their writers.

It's no coincidence that Planned Parenthood facilities are most common in black communities.  PP supporters would say that's because they go where the need is greatest; PP opponents argue that PP is targeting vulnerable populations.  Regardless of motives, for years now, more black babies are aborted in New York than are born alive.  It takes a twisted, ignorant mind to argue that the people who oppose this racial slaughter are themselves racists.

Even if one assumes solely for the sake of argument that McCorvey, a deeply troubled woman suffered a deathbed conversion back to her pro-abortion past, everything else in Bassett's article is wrong.  Today's pro-abortion leftists are the lineal descendants of Margaret Sanger and her fellow eugenicists, all of whom dream of a world without the "nasty" (and invariably dark skinned) underclass that makes their lives imperfect and uncomfortable.

Norma McCorvey was the "Roe" in Roe v. Wade, the case that found the emanations and penumbras that made abortion a constitutional right.  She was a sad woman.  When she was 13, her father abandoned the family, and her mother, a violent alcoholic, raised McCorvey and her older brother.

By age 11, McCorvey had ended up in a State School for Girls.  At 15, when she left the school, a relative raped her repeatedly.  By 1969, McCorvey had been married, divorced, had two children, developed a serious alcohol and drug problem, and become a lesbian.  This was the troubled woman who, when she became pregnant with her third child, moved to the center of the American abortion debate.  McCorvey eventually worked at an abortion facility.

In 1995, McCorvey publicly converted to Evangelical Christianity, quit the abortion facility, and announced that she was henceforth working with Operation Rescue, an anti-abortion organization.  Eventually, McCorvey converted to Catholicism.  She continued to work against abortion for the rest of her life, which ended in 2017, after a serious decline from heart failure.

The Daily Beast wrote the other day that a new documentary, AKA Jane Roe, shows footage of McCorvey purportedly confessing that her anti-abortion stance was "all an act" that she did for money.  "I was the big fish.  I think it was a mutual thing.  I took their money and they'd put me out in front of the cameras and tell me what to say.  That's what I'd say.  If a young woman wants to have an abortion, that's no skin off my ass.  That's why they call it choice."

Matt Walsh discusses why there's reason to be skeptical about both McCorvey's purported confession, as well as statements from those supporting her.  Tyler O'Neil believes that the documentary-makers may have lied to or manipulated the ailing McCorvey.

This post will not rehash those issues.  Instead, this post looks at Laura Bassett's GQ article arguing that the anti-abortion position has always been a right-wing Christian attack on blacks.  The article made headlines on Thursday because Bassett tried to support her argument by claiming that segregationist George Wallace was a Republican.  It was a stupid error (since corrected) and typical of a leftist journalist.  That's not what this post is about, either.

This post targets Bassett's bizarre leftist narrative that being pro-life means you're such a racist Christian that you want black babies not to die.  According to Bassett, conservative racists were pro-abortion up until Roe v. Wade.  They switched sides then because the moral majority used abortion as a way to entice pro-life (but still racist) Christians to become Republicans.

Margaret Sanger, who founded Planned Parenthood, is the saintly godmother of abortion in America.  Sanger, a race- and sex-obsessed socialist, was a member in good standing of the early 20th-century American progressive movement, a Democrat socialist movement that is the direct ancestor of today's Democrat progressives.  She was at home with the progressives of the era, who were also obsessed with racial purity, so much so that Hitler looked to American racial laws as his template for Germany's racial laws.

While Sanger did believe in freeing women from the burden of pregnancy, she was fully on board with race-based eugenics:

Sanger associated with racists and anti-Semites, people who despised everyone who was not a Nordic god or goddess, and those who demanded coercive eugenics programs to eliminate "lesser" humans. 

[snip]

Margaret Sanger's journal was primarily devoted to the legalization and spread of voluntary birth control.  However, the main theme running through The Birth Control Review was eugenics, thus the masthead "Birth Control:  To Create a Race of Thoroughbreds."

One of the most enthusiastic supporters of eugenics in the pages of The Birth Control Review was Professor Doktor Ernst Rudin, Adolf Hitler's Director of Genetic Sterilization and founder of the Nazi Gesellschaft fur Rassenhygiene [Society for Racial Hygiene]. [Citation omitted.] In fact, Rudin's boss, Adolf Hitler, avidly read American eugenics journals and developed his ideas of an Aryan "master race" from their writers.

It's no coincidence that Planned Parenthood facilities are most common in black communities.  PP supporters would say that's because they go where the need is greatest; PP opponents argue that PP is targeting vulnerable populations.  Regardless of motives, for years now, more black babies are aborted in New York than are born alive.  It takes a twisted, ignorant mind to argue that the people who oppose this racial slaughter are themselves racists.

Even if one assumes solely for the sake of argument that McCorvey, a deeply troubled woman suffered a deathbed conversion back to her pro-abortion past, everything else in Bassett's article is wrong.  Today's pro-abortion leftists are the lineal descendants of Margaret Sanger and her fellow eugenicists, all of whom dream of a world without the "nasty" (and invariably dark skinned) underclass that makes their lives imperfect and uncomfortable.