How to open America for business

Rightly or wrongly, our government has fallen under the influence of the bubble-bound epidemiology community.  Based on the ever inexact process of computer modeling, we have reversed three years of economic growth, devastated retirement savings, put millions of Americans out of work, increased our national debt by multiple trillions of dollars, and panicked citizens in an effort to protect our nation from a pandemic thrust upon the world as a result of Chinese government perfidy, World Health Organization (WHO) political bias or incompetence, and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) uncertainty.  Reasons for these actions notwithstanding, we are nearing the time to announce that America is again open for business. 

The greatest obstacle to the opening of America for business would seem not to be the lethality of the COVID-19 virus, but the lethality of the unconscionable politicization of the pandemic by a political party that sees this tragedy as an opportunity to be exploited rather than as a health crisis to be resolved.  This ongoing politicization creates unnecessary difficulties in getting America back to work.  In this regard, I have several suggestions.

First, when this 30-day shutdown draws to its close at month's end, and based on current CDC recommendations, I suggest that all Americans be required to wear a mask or face covering when in public — not for self-protection, but for the protection of others.  To those concerned about our personal loss of freedom, this would seem much less obtrusive than shutting down churches, shopping centers, non-essential businesses, sporting events, and everyday living.  While Democrats and the media will blame every ensuing death on our president, the American public will understand this action and applaud.

Secondly, by month's end, we will likely have evidence to convince even Dr. Fauci of the efficacy of certain pre-existing medications for either treating COVID-19 or increasing resistance to or the seriousness of its effects.  Should this be the case, the obvious step would be utilization of the appropriate medications in treatment, either prophylactically for the elderly and those with co-morbidities or following contraction of the disease. 

Thirdly, we need continued and expanded testing to determine who has or has had COVID-19.  The first key to containing spread of this very contagious virus would be the identification of those who have been infected.  By the same token, the key to successful treatment of the infected would seem to be early detection, before individuals become so critical as to require hospitalization or intubation.  The critical need for ventilators could likely be resolved by such early detection and treatment of the disease.

Finally, the president, governors, and other spokespersons should continue to encourage, educate, and cajole all Americans to rigidly follow the steps necessary for good hygiene: appropriate cleaning and disinfection; routine washing of hands; avoidance of touching nose, eyes, and mouth; keeping away from other people; and forgoing for the time being handshakes and unnecessary contact outside the immediate family.  These things are simple and have been shown to work.

While these few changes would not be difficult, they would likely make an incredible difference in the ongoing battle against COVID-19 and would allow America to quickly put out the "Open for Business" sign necessary to avoid the depression that awaits us should we do nothing.

Image credit: Pixabay public domain.

Rightly or wrongly, our government has fallen under the influence of the bubble-bound epidemiology community.  Based on the ever inexact process of computer modeling, we have reversed three years of economic growth, devastated retirement savings, put millions of Americans out of work, increased our national debt by multiple trillions of dollars, and panicked citizens in an effort to protect our nation from a pandemic thrust upon the world as a result of Chinese government perfidy, World Health Organization (WHO) political bias or incompetence, and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) uncertainty.  Reasons for these actions notwithstanding, we are nearing the time to announce that America is again open for business. 

The greatest obstacle to the opening of America for business would seem not to be the lethality of the COVID-19 virus, but the lethality of the unconscionable politicization of the pandemic by a political party that sees this tragedy as an opportunity to be exploited rather than as a health crisis to be resolved.  This ongoing politicization creates unnecessary difficulties in getting America back to work.  In this regard, I have several suggestions.

First, when this 30-day shutdown draws to its close at month's end, and based on current CDC recommendations, I suggest that all Americans be required to wear a mask or face covering when in public — not for self-protection, but for the protection of others.  To those concerned about our personal loss of freedom, this would seem much less obtrusive than shutting down churches, shopping centers, non-essential businesses, sporting events, and everyday living.  While Democrats and the media will blame every ensuing death on our president, the American public will understand this action and applaud.

Secondly, by month's end, we will likely have evidence to convince even Dr. Fauci of the efficacy of certain pre-existing medications for either treating COVID-19 or increasing resistance to or the seriousness of its effects.  Should this be the case, the obvious step would be utilization of the appropriate medications in treatment, either prophylactically for the elderly and those with co-morbidities or following contraction of the disease. 

Thirdly, we need continued and expanded testing to determine who has or has had COVID-19.  The first key to containing spread of this very contagious virus would be the identification of those who have been infected.  By the same token, the key to successful treatment of the infected would seem to be early detection, before individuals become so critical as to require hospitalization or intubation.  The critical need for ventilators could likely be resolved by such early detection and treatment of the disease.

Finally, the president, governors, and other spokespersons should continue to encourage, educate, and cajole all Americans to rigidly follow the steps necessary for good hygiene: appropriate cleaning and disinfection; routine washing of hands; avoidance of touching nose, eyes, and mouth; keeping away from other people; and forgoing for the time being handshakes and unnecessary contact outside the immediate family.  These things are simple and have been shown to work.

While these few changes would not be difficult, they would likely make an incredible difference in the ongoing battle against COVID-19 and would allow America to quickly put out the "Open for Business" sign necessary to avoid the depression that awaits us should we do nothing.

Image credit: Pixabay public domain.