Globalists are using COVID-19 to ram through creepy 'development goals'

COVID-19 appears to be triggering various global planning initiatives and recommendations seemingly ripe for immediate implementation.  Here's a review of just a few of the proposals that could radically alter life as we know it, starting with Bill Gates, who was recently asked during an online AMA session how businesses can "operate to maintain our economy while providing social distancing."  Gates insists that "eventually, we will have some digital certificates to show who has recovered or been tested recently or when we have a vaccine who has received it." 

According to "the McKinsey Global Institute ... 3.4 billion people have some form of ID but ... limited ability to use it in the digital world," and "given the critical role of identification for development, the UN Member States have adopted Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Target 16.9: 'to provide legal identity for all, including birth registration' by 2030."  This ID program is being touted as an "enabler of many other SDG goals and targets, such as financial and economic inclusion, social protection, healthcare and education, gender equality, child protection, agriculture, good governance, and safe and orderly migration." 

If that's not enough to make you shudder, consider Gates's research partners.  They include the Open Society Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation, with input from the Center for Global Development, iSPIRT, the United Nations Development Program, the World Bank Group's ID4D initiative, and the World Economic Forum.  Other virus-fueled initiatives that will move us closer to Agenda 2030 include the implementation of "workplace level occupational safety and health practices in line with relevant International Labor Standards"; "new and various types of cash transfer programs"; "employment-intensive investments in health, water, sanitation, and hygiene infrastructure and services"; "social protection systems and public infrastructures for social services"; and "persistent social dialogue between governments and social partners ... in developing effective responses at the enterprise, sectoral and macroeconomic level."

Regrettably, it could also be argued that the USMCA will hasten our commitment to Agenda 2030.

Remember the goals, and consider the level of pain and suffering  required for such a plan to come to fruition.  That's when the real pain and suffering will begin.

  1. No Poverty 
  2. Zero Hunger 
  3. Good Health and Well-Being 
  4. Quality Education 
  5. Gender Equality 
  6. Clean Water and Sanitation
  7. Affordable and Clean Energy
  8. Decent Work and Economic Growth
  9. Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure
  10. Reducing Inequality
  11. Sustainable Cities and Communities
  12. Responsible Consumption and Production
  13. Climate Action
  14. Life below Water
  15. Life on Land
  16. Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions
  17. Partnerships for the Goals

Image: sanjitbakshi via Flickr.

COVID-19 appears to be triggering various global planning initiatives and recommendations seemingly ripe for immediate implementation.  Here's a review of just a few of the proposals that could radically alter life as we know it, starting with Bill Gates, who was recently asked during an online AMA session how businesses can "operate to maintain our economy while providing social distancing."  Gates insists that "eventually, we will have some digital certificates to show who has recovered or been tested recently or when we have a vaccine who has received it." 

According to "the McKinsey Global Institute ... 3.4 billion people have some form of ID but ... limited ability to use it in the digital world," and "given the critical role of identification for development, the UN Member States have adopted Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Target 16.9: 'to provide legal identity for all, including birth registration' by 2030."  This ID program is being touted as an "enabler of many other SDG goals and targets, such as financial and economic inclusion, social protection, healthcare and education, gender equality, child protection, agriculture, good governance, and safe and orderly migration." 

If that's not enough to make you shudder, consider Gates's research partners.  They include the Open Society Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation, with input from the Center for Global Development, iSPIRT, the United Nations Development Program, the World Bank Group's ID4D initiative, and the World Economic Forum.  Other virus-fueled initiatives that will move us closer to Agenda 2030 include the implementation of "workplace level occupational safety and health practices in line with relevant International Labor Standards"; "new and various types of cash transfer programs"; "employment-intensive investments in health, water, sanitation, and hygiene infrastructure and services"; "social protection systems and public infrastructures for social services"; and "persistent social dialogue between governments and social partners ... in developing effective responses at the enterprise, sectoral and macroeconomic level."

Regrettably, it could also be argued that the USMCA will hasten our commitment to Agenda 2030.

Remember the goals, and consider the level of pain and suffering  required for such a plan to come to fruition.  That's when the real pain and suffering will begin.

  1. No Poverty 
  2. Zero Hunger 
  3. Good Health and Well-Being 
  4. Quality Education 
  5. Gender Equality 
  6. Clean Water and Sanitation
  7. Affordable and Clean Energy
  8. Decent Work and Economic Growth
  9. Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure
  10. Reducing Inequality
  11. Sustainable Cities and Communities
  12. Responsible Consumption and Production
  13. Climate Action
  14. Life below Water
  15. Life on Land
  16. Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions
  17. Partnerships for the Goals

Image: sanjitbakshi via Flickr.