American free market ingenuity continues in the time of the Wuhan Covid-19 emergency

Americans may be down a bit during this current national--or international--emergency but they are definitely not out.  The ingenuity and creativity of Americans to produce and innovate along with the right to retain most of the resulting rewards--such as advances in the high tech field where Americans so dominate--is being matched during the current crisis on a more basic level while keeping America great.

Sanitizers are desperately needed to keep the COVID-19 disease at bay and so not only will there be sanitizers, there will be artisanal sanitizers. In attractive glass flasks no less.  

The Latest Craft Product From Brooklyn Distilleries: Artisanal Hand Sanitizer

NewNew York City’s hospitality industry has been decimated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Bars have been shuttered. Most restaurant staff have been laid off. But local distilleries are still up and running, producing the most Brooklyn of all medical products: small-batch artisanal hand sanitizer in glass flasks.

“I never thought in my life that I’d be in the hand sanitizer business,” says Stephen DeAngelo, founder of Greenhook Ginsmiths in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

“I don’t think the future is too bright for gin right now,” says DeAngelo who, like most distillers, relies on restaurants and bars for a large percentage of his sales. “This helps to keep my staff busy at this time, and we’re doing a lot of good for the hospitals as well.”

Greenhook Ginsmiths already has two orders from hospitals, for 2,500 gallons and 1,700 gallons of hand sanitizer, respectively. Some distilleries are giving it away for free, while others are asking for small donations to cover costs.

St. Agrestis Spirits, which focuses on bottled cocktails but uses its base gin to produce hand sanitizer, has been including a bottle of artisanal hand sanitizer with every order, which started on Tuesday after the state relaxed laws on booze-to-go. The distillery has partnered with Greenhook Ginsmith on deliveries.

“Delivery is keeping us alive right now,” says St. Agrestis founder Louis Catizone.

For those who want the Christmas spirit in their sanitizer

Potter himself uses a 87 percent alcohol that is “perfectly good gin that is a little bit old, and doesn’t taste the way we want it to.” As a result, his hand sanitizer smells a little bit like Christmas, which is characteristic of the juniper berries used in the distillation of gin.

“Juniper berries have always had a reputation for medicine,” says Potter. “It has been used since the Ancient Greeks for things such as an upset stomach. Juniper also has a very long history as being antiseptic, and having antimicrobial properties.”

Antiseptic is important.  And so is eating.  Although authorities throughout the country have ordered restaurants to close, restaurant take out, drive through and  home delivery are still allowed.  And since people still have to drink something to go with their food at home in 

California, you can now get cocktails delivered to your home during shelter in place

Drive-through beer pick-ups? Craft cocktails delivered to your door?

The state’s Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) is temporarily relaxing several regulations in order to provide some relief for restaurants, bars and liquor stores that have been hard hit by shelter-in-place orders that have either severely restricted their businesses or forced them to close. The new rules make it easier for businesses to sell alcohol to customers while the orders are in effect. (snip)

By Friday morning, Christ Aivaliotis, owner of the Kon-Tiki bar in Oakland, was already working on creating mai tais and zombies for delivery. The announcement that he could now offer some of his tiki drinks to customers came as a huge relief. “We bought a bottling system,” Aivaliotis said, “similar to what you’d use to bottle beer.” He re-hired some of the laid-off employees as delivery drivers. He began delivering the bottled drinks to customers in Oakland at 5 p.m. on Friday— as long as they also ordered some food, a condition of the ABC’s relaxed regulation. The fruity rum drinks, intended for two or more people to share, cost $18-$28.

In less than two hours on Friday, they sold out of all 96 bottles they’d made.

So much safer as all the drinking is done at home so no drunk driving home from a restaurant/bar. 

But a private auto meets the requirement for the safety of self isolation so drive-throughs for--hopefully--sober drivers have quickly emerged

One Las Vegas strip club is staying open amid a 30-day shutdown recommended by Gov. Steve Sisolak and taking social distancing to another level by offering drive-through strip shows. (snip)

“We’re going to offer drive-up window strip shows,” said Ryan Carlson, director of operations for Little Darlings. “Guests can drive up to the front door and we’re going to have dancers separate by the 6-foot separation rule and they can enjoy a totally nude show right from the seat of their car.”

The 10 minute drive-up shows will run a patron $100 — tips encouraged — and are expected to begin at 8 p.m. Saturday and continue as demand warrants.

As these few examples demonstrate--and there are so many more--the ability and willingness of so many to so quickly adapt to meet the ever changing requirements of an unexpected and unprecedented situation proves--once again--that although there will be unfortunately great pain, Americans will emerge from this stronger than ever and make America greater. 

Americans may be down a bit during this current national--or international--emergency but they are definitely not out.  The ingenuity and creativity of Americans to produce and innovate along with the right to retain most of the resulting rewards--such as advances in the high tech field where Americans so dominate--is being matched during the current crisis on a more basic level while keeping America great.

Sanitizers are desperately needed to keep the COVID-19 disease at bay and so not only will there be sanitizers, there will be artisanal sanitizers. In attractive glass flasks no less.  

The Latest Craft Product From Brooklyn Distilleries: Artisanal Hand Sanitizer

NewNew York City’s hospitality industry has been decimated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Bars have been shuttered. Most restaurant staff have been laid off. But local distilleries are still up and running, producing the most Brooklyn of all medical products: small-batch artisanal hand sanitizer in glass flasks.

“I never thought in my life that I’d be in the hand sanitizer business,” says Stephen DeAngelo, founder of Greenhook Ginsmiths in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

“I don’t think the future is too bright for gin right now,” says DeAngelo who, like most distillers, relies on restaurants and bars for a large percentage of his sales. “This helps to keep my staff busy at this time, and we’re doing a lot of good for the hospitals as well.”

Greenhook Ginsmiths already has two orders from hospitals, for 2,500 gallons and 1,700 gallons of hand sanitizer, respectively. Some distilleries are giving it away for free, while others are asking for small donations to cover costs.

St. Agrestis Spirits, which focuses on bottled cocktails but uses its base gin to produce hand sanitizer, has been including a bottle of artisanal hand sanitizer with every order, which started on Tuesday after the state relaxed laws on booze-to-go. The distillery has partnered with Greenhook Ginsmith on deliveries.

“Delivery is keeping us alive right now,” says St. Agrestis founder Louis Catizone.

For those who want the Christmas spirit in their sanitizer

Potter himself uses a 87 percent alcohol that is “perfectly good gin that is a little bit old, and doesn’t taste the way we want it to.” As a result, his hand sanitizer smells a little bit like Christmas, which is characteristic of the juniper berries used in the distillation of gin.

“Juniper berries have always had a reputation for medicine,” says Potter. “It has been used since the Ancient Greeks for things such as an upset stomach. Juniper also has a very long history as being antiseptic, and having antimicrobial properties.”

Antiseptic is important.  And so is eating.  Although authorities throughout the country have ordered restaurants to close, restaurant take out, drive through and  home delivery are still allowed.  And since people still have to drink something to go with their food at home in 

California, you can now get cocktails delivered to your home during shelter in place

Drive-through beer pick-ups? Craft cocktails delivered to your door?

The state’s Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) is temporarily relaxing several regulations in order to provide some relief for restaurants, bars and liquor stores that have been hard hit by shelter-in-place orders that have either severely restricted their businesses or forced them to close. The new rules make it easier for businesses to sell alcohol to customers while the orders are in effect. (snip)

By Friday morning, Christ Aivaliotis, owner of the Kon-Tiki bar in Oakland, was already working on creating mai tais and zombies for delivery. The announcement that he could now offer some of his tiki drinks to customers came as a huge relief. “We bought a bottling system,” Aivaliotis said, “similar to what you’d use to bottle beer.” He re-hired some of the laid-off employees as delivery drivers. He began delivering the bottled drinks to customers in Oakland at 5 p.m. on Friday— as long as they also ordered some food, a condition of the ABC’s relaxed regulation. The fruity rum drinks, intended for two or more people to share, cost $18-$28.

In less than two hours on Friday, they sold out of all 96 bottles they’d made.

So much safer as all the drinking is done at home so no drunk driving home from a restaurant/bar. 

But a private auto meets the requirement for the safety of self isolation so drive-throughs for--hopefully--sober drivers have quickly emerged

One Las Vegas strip club is staying open amid a 30-day shutdown recommended by Gov. Steve Sisolak and taking social distancing to another level by offering drive-through strip shows. (snip)

“We’re going to offer drive-up window strip shows,” said Ryan Carlson, director of operations for Little Darlings. “Guests can drive up to the front door and we’re going to have dancers separate by the 6-foot separation rule and they can enjoy a totally nude show right from the seat of their car.”

The 10 minute drive-up shows will run a patron $100 — tips encouraged — and are expected to begin at 8 p.m. Saturday and continue as demand warrants.

As these few examples demonstrate--and there are so many more--the ability and willingness of so many to so quickly adapt to meet the ever changing requirements of an unexpected and unprecedented situation proves--once again--that although there will be unfortunately great pain, Americans will emerge from this stronger than ever and make America greater.