West Point cadets vindicated on ridiculous charge of 'white supremacist' hand gesture at Army-Navy Game

Some people are so hysterical with fever-crazed hallucinations of omnipresent racism that they throw out reckless charges and cause people who should know better to launch official "investigations."  Such was the case a week ago when, during the telecast of the Army-Navy Game, a West Point cadet played a common trick among adolescent and post-adolescent males, known to generations as "The Circle Game."


Twitter screen grab.

The reaction on Twitter was almost immediate:

And the MSM jumped on board:

On these pages, Trevor Thomas drew on his 27 years of teaching high school to debunk the charges.

Of all the ridiculous, baseless charges of racism taken seriously by people who ought to know better, the claim that cadets used a racist hand gesture at the Army-Navy Game last weekend is among the worst, because it slimes the best among us, who are part of the least racist institution in the United States (and the world). (snip)

In case you're unfamiliar, in this game, a person makes a circle with his thumb and forefinger, exactly as if you're making the "okay" sign, except this finger circle is usually held low, near one's waist, or off to the side, or wherever is needed.  The circle-maker then attempts to get their target, usually a friend, to look at the finger circle.  If one looks, then one gets punched in the arm.

After six days of wasting the time of our military leaders and putting cadets through hell, the United States Military Academy officially rejected the charges:

The only way this madness will stop is if we point out how the icons of the Left can be stigmatized with the same ridiculous charges:

Some people are so hysterical with fever-crazed hallucinations of omnipresent racism that they throw out reckless charges and cause people who should know better to launch official "investigations."  Such was the case a week ago when, during the telecast of the Army-Navy Game, a West Point cadet played a common trick among adolescent and post-adolescent males, known to generations as "The Circle Game."


Twitter screen grab.

The reaction on Twitter was almost immediate:

And the MSM jumped on board:

On these pages, Trevor Thomas drew on his 27 years of teaching high school to debunk the charges.

Of all the ridiculous, baseless charges of racism taken seriously by people who ought to know better, the claim that cadets used a racist hand gesture at the Army-Navy Game last weekend is among the worst, because it slimes the best among us, who are part of the least racist institution in the United States (and the world). (snip)

In case you're unfamiliar, in this game, a person makes a circle with his thumb and forefinger, exactly as if you're making the "okay" sign, except this finger circle is usually held low, near one's waist, or off to the side, or wherever is needed.  The circle-maker then attempts to get their target, usually a friend, to look at the finger circle.  If one looks, then one gets punched in the arm.

After six days of wasting the time of our military leaders and putting cadets through hell, the United States Military Academy officially rejected the charges:

The only way this madness will stop is if we point out how the icons of the Left can be stigmatized with the same ridiculous charges: