Nancy and Ted — hypocrisy writ large

Teddy Kennedy of Chappaquiddick infamy made quite a name for himself even after that scandal.

In 1985, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Sen. Christopher J. Dodd (D-Conn.) were at a restaurant in Washington, D.C., where they both were very drunk.  When their dates retired to the ladies' room, both men summoned a waitress to their private dining room.  Kennedy forced the waitress on top of Dodd where they both groped the young woman "sandwiched" between them.  Her screams alerted others, who separated them.

On March 29, 1991, Senator Kennedy was in a bar carousing with his nephew, William Smith, then 30 years old, and his son Patrick.  They met two young women, whom they invited to their nearby home.  Smith and the 29-year-old woman went to the beach, where the woman alleged that he raped her.  Although three women were willing to testify that Smith had sexually assaulted them in incidents in the 1980s, their testimony was excluded, and Smith was acquitted.  Senator Kennedy was upbraided for hosting the seamy event under the influence of alcohol.

And then there is this report:

1991 Tim Sebastian, a reporter for the London Times, came across an arresting memorandum. Composed in 1983 by Victor Chebrikov, the top man at the KGB, the memorandum was addressed to Yuri Andropov. The subject: Sen. Edward Kennedy.

"On 9-10 May of this year," the May 14 memorandum explained, "Sen. Edward Kennedy's close friend and trusted confidant [John] Tunney was in Moscow." (Tunney was Kennedy's law school roommate and a former Democratic senator from California.) "The senator charged Tunney to convey the following message, through confidential contacts, to the General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Y. Andropov."

Kennedy's message was simple. He proposed an unabashed quid pro quo. Kennedy would lend Andropov a hand in dealing with President Reagan. In return, the Soviet leader would lend the Democratic Party a hand in challenging Reagan in the 1984 presidential election. "The only real potential threats to Reagan are problems of war and peace and Soviet-American relations," the memorandum stated. "These issues, according to the senator, will without a doubt become the most important of the election campaign."

Kennedy's motives? "Like other rational people," the memorandum explained, "[Kennedy] is very troubled by the current state of Soviet-American relations." But that high-minded concern represented only one of Kennedy's motives. Tunney remarked that the senator wants to run for president in 1988[.]

Hmmm...

Here is how Nancy Pelosi eulogized Ted Kennedy when he slipped his mortal coil in 2009:

Today, with the passing of Senator Edward M. Kennedy, the American people have lost a great patriot, and the Kennedy family has lost a beloved patriarch. Over a lifetime of leadership, Senator Kennedy's statesmanship and political prowess produced a wealth of accomplishment that has improved opportunity for every American.

Senator Kennedy had a grand vision for America, and an unparalleled ability to effect change. Rooted in his deep patriotism, his abiding faith, and his deep concern for the least among us, no one has done more than Senator Kennedy to educate our children, care for our seniors, and ensure equality for all Americans.

So we find a clear thread from Teddy to Nancy, from the Democrats of 1983 to the Democrats of 2019, a thread composed of dishonesty, hypocrisy, corruption, and fraud.  America required better back in the '80s.  It requires the same today. 

Teddy Kennedy of Chappaquiddick infamy made quite a name for himself even after that scandal.

In 1985, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Sen. Christopher J. Dodd (D-Conn.) were at a restaurant in Washington, D.C., where they both were very drunk.  When their dates retired to the ladies' room, both men summoned a waitress to their private dining room.  Kennedy forced the waitress on top of Dodd where they both groped the young woman "sandwiched" between them.  Her screams alerted others, who separated them.

On March 29, 1991, Senator Kennedy was in a bar carousing with his nephew, William Smith, then 30 years old, and his son Patrick.  They met two young women, whom they invited to their nearby home.  Smith and the 29-year-old woman went to the beach, where the woman alleged that he raped her.  Although three women were willing to testify that Smith had sexually assaulted them in incidents in the 1980s, their testimony was excluded, and Smith was acquitted.  Senator Kennedy was upbraided for hosting the seamy event under the influence of alcohol.

And then there is this report:

1991 Tim Sebastian, a reporter for the London Times, came across an arresting memorandum. Composed in 1983 by Victor Chebrikov, the top man at the KGB, the memorandum was addressed to Yuri Andropov. The subject: Sen. Edward Kennedy.

"On 9-10 May of this year," the May 14 memorandum explained, "Sen. Edward Kennedy's close friend and trusted confidant [John] Tunney was in Moscow." (Tunney was Kennedy's law school roommate and a former Democratic senator from California.) "The senator charged Tunney to convey the following message, through confidential contacts, to the General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Y. Andropov."

Kennedy's message was simple. He proposed an unabashed quid pro quo. Kennedy would lend Andropov a hand in dealing with President Reagan. In return, the Soviet leader would lend the Democratic Party a hand in challenging Reagan in the 1984 presidential election. "The only real potential threats to Reagan are problems of war and peace and Soviet-American relations," the memorandum stated. "These issues, according to the senator, will without a doubt become the most important of the election campaign."

Kennedy's motives? "Like other rational people," the memorandum explained, "[Kennedy] is very troubled by the current state of Soviet-American relations." But that high-minded concern represented only one of Kennedy's motives. Tunney remarked that the senator wants to run for president in 1988[.]

Hmmm...

Here is how Nancy Pelosi eulogized Ted Kennedy when he slipped his mortal coil in 2009:

Today, with the passing of Senator Edward M. Kennedy, the American people have lost a great patriot, and the Kennedy family has lost a beloved patriarch. Over a lifetime of leadership, Senator Kennedy's statesmanship and political prowess produced a wealth of accomplishment that has improved opportunity for every American.

Senator Kennedy had a grand vision for America, and an unparalleled ability to effect change. Rooted in his deep patriotism, his abiding faith, and his deep concern for the least among us, no one has done more than Senator Kennedy to educate our children, care for our seniors, and ensure equality for all Americans.

So we find a clear thread from Teddy to Nancy, from the Democrats of 1983 to the Democrats of 2019, a thread composed of dishonesty, hypocrisy, corruption, and fraud.  America required better back in the '80s.  It requires the same today.