Dingell is not immune

At Trump's rally in Battle Creek, Michigan on the eve of his impeachment, the president made a comment suggesting that former Michigan representative John Dingell did not go to heaven when he died.  His widow, Representative Debbie Dingell (who took over his seat), tweetsponded: 

Mr. President, let's set politics aside.  I'm preparing for the first holiday season without the man I love. You brought me down in a way you can never imagine and your hurtful words just made my healing much harder.

The smartest thing would have been for Rep. Dingell to just ignore this, but she fell for the bait.  I understand her loss and sorrow, and traditionally, we conservatives try to be respectful about things like that.  We try to be respectful in our debates and about our differences.  We try to reach across the aisle.  We always try to take the bloody high road.  We cling to our sense of dignity and integrity and try to live by the Golden Rule.  But the fact is, we are rarely on the receiving end of the same kind of respect, and our olive branches are often slapped aside.  We are endlessly derided and ridiculed by the left.  Our values are mocked, our faith spurned.  We heard the disparaging comments and relentless insults during the impeachment hearings leveled at our representatives for supposedly shirking their constitutional duties, spreading Russian propaganda, and lying.  Democrats were taking the moral high ground while Republicans were defending a criminal.  Democrats, we were repeatedly admonished, did not want to impeach the president, but he left them no choice, forcing them to vote "yes."

Trump has shown us the power of punching back.  Politics is war, and we are engaged no longer in isolated skirmishes, but in a full blown civil war for the very soul of America.  We are at the point where it is hard to see how both ideologies can coexist, given the lack of tolerance the left displays toward conservatives.  We either allow them to defeat us or fight to win.  If the pussy hat brigade think they have a monopoly on anger, they are in for a surprise.  The gloves are off.

One of the things we did in the San Francisco Tea Party to channel our anger constructively was to turn the words and actions of the Democrats back on them.  I think a fitting albeit lengthy Ttwitter response to Rep. Dingell should sound something like this:

Representative Dingell, sorry about your husband but you can't have things both ways.  You cannot target half the country for three years and then be upset when you are targeted.  We can't set politics aside because you and your party have injected politics into everything we do from the sports we watch to the bathrooms we use.  We are preparing for our first holiday season with the man we voted for as President having been illegitimately impeached.  You accused Republicans of shirking their constitutional duties and you smiled and cheered as you nullified 63 million votes you are too scared to fight at the ballot box — bringing 63 million hardworking, loyal Americans down in a way you can never imagine.  Their only transgression was to elect their candidate and not yours.  Your hurtful words and deplorable actions and those of your Democrat colleagues over the last three years, just made any healing much harder.

There.  That's better.

At Trump's rally in Battle Creek, Michigan on the eve of his impeachment, the president made a comment suggesting that former Michigan representative John Dingell did not go to heaven when he died.  His widow, Representative Debbie Dingell (who took over his seat), tweetsponded: 

Mr. President, let's set politics aside.  I'm preparing for the first holiday season without the man I love. You brought me down in a way you can never imagine and your hurtful words just made my healing much harder.

The smartest thing would have been for Rep. Dingell to just ignore this, but she fell for the bait.  I understand her loss and sorrow, and traditionally, we conservatives try to be respectful about things like that.  We try to be respectful in our debates and about our differences.  We try to reach across the aisle.  We always try to take the bloody high road.  We cling to our sense of dignity and integrity and try to live by the Golden Rule.  But the fact is, we are rarely on the receiving end of the same kind of respect, and our olive branches are often slapped aside.  We are endlessly derided and ridiculed by the left.  Our values are mocked, our faith spurned.  We heard the disparaging comments and relentless insults during the impeachment hearings leveled at our representatives for supposedly shirking their constitutional duties, spreading Russian propaganda, and lying.  Democrats were taking the moral high ground while Republicans were defending a criminal.  Democrats, we were repeatedly admonished, did not want to impeach the president, but he left them no choice, forcing them to vote "yes."

Trump has shown us the power of punching back.  Politics is war, and we are engaged no longer in isolated skirmishes, but in a full blown civil war for the very soul of America.  We are at the point where it is hard to see how both ideologies can coexist, given the lack of tolerance the left displays toward conservatives.  We either allow them to defeat us or fight to win.  If the pussy hat brigade think they have a monopoly on anger, they are in for a surprise.  The gloves are off.

One of the things we did in the San Francisco Tea Party to channel our anger constructively was to turn the words and actions of the Democrats back on them.  I think a fitting albeit lengthy Ttwitter response to Rep. Dingell should sound something like this:

Representative Dingell, sorry about your husband but you can't have things both ways.  You cannot target half the country for three years and then be upset when you are targeted.  We can't set politics aside because you and your party have injected politics into everything we do from the sports we watch to the bathrooms we use.  We are preparing for our first holiday season with the man we voted for as President having been illegitimately impeached.  You accused Republicans of shirking their constitutional duties and you smiled and cheered as you nullified 63 million votes you are too scared to fight at the ballot box — bringing 63 million hardworking, loyal Americans down in a way you can never imagine.  Their only transgression was to elect their candidate and not yours.  Your hurtful words and deplorable actions and those of your Democrat colleagues over the last three years, just made any healing much harder.

There.  That's better.