Bloomberg launches more sneaky pete

You've got to wonder about a guy like Michael Bloomberg, entering late into the Democrats' presidential race. Is his entry into this race normal? Is something going on under the surface? Why are Democrats putting up with it? He doesn't even care if he's in the Democratic debates, for one thing, something the other Democratic candidates are raising holy hell about as they get disqualified. But not Bloomie. He seems to have some other game going on.

Richer than Croesus, he's using some of his pocket change to saturate the television market with ad after ad on the belief that Americans can be talked voting him into office just through constantly hearing from him. The poor doofuses always buy if they hear something advertised long enough, right?

Now there's news that he's got a new sneaky-pete venture, having invested in a secretive company with no website called 'Hawkfish' to manipulate all those proles out there into voting for him. 

According to CNBC:

Presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg is pouring tens of millions of dollars from his vast personal fortune into his campaign. A piece of it is going to an unknown digital business called Hawkfish — which Bloomberg himself founded during the spring.

Hawkfish will be the “primary digital agency and technology services provider for the campaign,” Julie Wood, a Bloomberg campaign spokeswoman, told CNBC. She added that the firm “is now providing digital ad services, including content creation, ad placement and analytics” for their campaign. It will also help Democratic races across the country in future election cycles, she said.

It's weird stuff, very manipulative, and probably within character from him, given that he has already founded a very clever media empire premised on just the right timing. Bloomberg knows how to use media to move markets, taking it this time to the voter market.

No wonder he doesn't care if he makes the debates or not. He's got all the data from everything you've clicked on your computer screen, and will respond accordingly.

Which is kind of queasy-making, given his talents.

But it's also not queasy-making in that he's already been at it for a few months and he's not taking territory. As I argued earlier, the more he talks, the more the viewers dislike him

Mike Allen, over at Axios, notes that the Trump people have a social media campaign, too, and they're masters at it:

The RNC goes into the presidential election year with more than seven times as much cash on hand as the DNC — $63 million vs. $8.3 million, according to the parties' FEC filings.

Why it matters: Far from putting Republicans back on their heels, impeachment is energizing Trump's base just as the 2020 march to Election Day kicks off.

  • This is a stark new sign of what we've been reporting all year — that President Trump's digitally driven campaign is giving him a massive fundraising and organizing advantage over whoever emerges from the Democratic race.

Allen notes this trend repeatedly with Trump, and it seems to be working. Why would it be different from Bloomberg? Well, because in Trump's case, it pairs with well something substantial going on, a swamp that has one set of laws for itself and another set of laws for the rest of us. And Trump himself serves as a proxy for the people, whom he never insults, despite being a billionaire himself.

Bloomberg is a billionaire, too, but a very different kind, one whose totalitarian instincts find an easy home in the socialism of the Democratic Party, but still holds a note of discord among the wokesters, who with the ghost of Occupy! Wall Street in them, abhor billionaires as bad guys. Bloomberg, though, very much targets little guys. He's the one who wanted to tax working people to keep them from spending their money on foolish things. And since he's worth about $55 bil in the billionaire world, he's no garden-variety billionaire like Trump is, but a big one, whose bid to tax other billionaires is a bid to tax proles, because the prole-line for him starts at the $1 billion mark. And for anyone worth less than that, well, tax them to keep them from spending their money on things they shouldn't be buying. No choices for them. Get the runways cleared so billionaires will have jet travel for themselves. Especially the real proles whose votes he now wants.

Could he make up for that with social media manipulations instead? I find it hard to believe, given that his socialist agenda is a move against nature. Trump's the one with the wind at his back and a social media operation that's humming. It's possible Bloomberg has more than this up his sleeve, but I kind of doubt it. It's the truth of things that makes Trump so popular. How Bloomberg can get around that with all the contradictions in his campaign, is another question.

 

  

 

You've got to wonder about a guy like Michael Bloomberg, entering late into the Democrats' presidential race. Is his entry into this race normal? Is something going on under the surface? Why are Democrats putting up with it? He doesn't even care if he's in the Democratic debates, for one thing, something the other Democratic candidates are raising holy hell about as they get disqualified. But not Bloomie. He seems to have some other game going on.

Richer than Croesus, he's using some of his pocket change to saturate the television market with ad after ad on the belief that Americans can be talked voting him into office just through constantly hearing from him. The poor doofuses always buy if they hear something advertised long enough, right?

Now there's news that he's got a new sneaky-pete venture, having invested in a secretive company with no website called 'Hawkfish' to manipulate all those proles out there into voting for him. 

According to CNBC:

Presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg is pouring tens of millions of dollars from his vast personal fortune into his campaign. A piece of it is going to an unknown digital business called Hawkfish — which Bloomberg himself founded during the spring.

Hawkfish will be the “primary digital agency and technology services provider for the campaign,” Julie Wood, a Bloomberg campaign spokeswoman, told CNBC. She added that the firm “is now providing digital ad services, including content creation, ad placement and analytics” for their campaign. It will also help Democratic races across the country in future election cycles, she said.

It's weird stuff, very manipulative, and probably within character from him, given that he has already founded a very clever media empire premised on just the right timing. Bloomberg knows how to use media to move markets, taking it this time to the voter market.

No wonder he doesn't care if he makes the debates or not. He's got all the data from everything you've clicked on your computer screen, and will respond accordingly.

Which is kind of queasy-making, given his talents.

But it's also not queasy-making in that he's already been at it for a few months and he's not taking territory. As I argued earlier, the more he talks, the more the viewers dislike him

Mike Allen, over at Axios, notes that the Trump people have a social media campaign, too, and they're masters at it:

The RNC goes into the presidential election year with more than seven times as much cash on hand as the DNC — $63 million vs. $8.3 million, according to the parties' FEC filings.

Why it matters: Far from putting Republicans back on their heels, impeachment is energizing Trump's base just as the 2020 march to Election Day kicks off.

  • This is a stark new sign of what we've been reporting all year — that President Trump's digitally driven campaign is giving him a massive fundraising and organizing advantage over whoever emerges from the Democratic race.

Allen notes this trend repeatedly with Trump, and it seems to be working. Why would it be different from Bloomberg? Well, because in Trump's case, it pairs with well something substantial going on, a swamp that has one set of laws for itself and another set of laws for the rest of us. And Trump himself serves as a proxy for the people, whom he never insults, despite being a billionaire himself.

Bloomberg is a billionaire, too, but a very different kind, one whose totalitarian instincts find an easy home in the socialism of the Democratic Party, but still holds a note of discord among the wokesters, who with the ghost of Occupy! Wall Street in them, abhor billionaires as bad guys. Bloomberg, though, very much targets little guys. He's the one who wanted to tax working people to keep them from spending their money on foolish things. And since he's worth about $55 bil in the billionaire world, he's no garden-variety billionaire like Trump is, but a big one, whose bid to tax other billionaires is a bid to tax proles, because the prole-line for him starts at the $1 billion mark. And for anyone worth less than that, well, tax them to keep them from spending their money on things they shouldn't be buying. No choices for them. Get the runways cleared so billionaires will have jet travel for themselves. Especially the real proles whose votes he now wants.

Could he make up for that with social media manipulations instead? I find it hard to believe, given that his socialist agenda is a move against nature. Trump's the one with the wind at his back and a social media operation that's humming. It's possible Bloomberg has more than this up his sleeve, but I kind of doubt it. It's the truth of things that makes Trump so popular. How Bloomberg can get around that with all the contradictions in his campaign, is another question.