CBS to make in-kind campaign contribution to Dems with election season mini-series based on Comey's book

The media are all in on driving President Trump from office, either by impeachment or electoral defeat.  An example of the latter comes from CBS — not from the biased news division, but from the entertainment branch of the corporation.  The corporation is investing in a mini-series based on James Comey's self-serving book, A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies and Leadership.

To play leading roles, the network has assembled hard-Left Trump-haters.  Variety (mis)reports:

The CBS Studios miniseries based on James Comey's book "A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies and Leadership" has added another player.

Robert Coyote [sic] has boarded the show to play Robert Mueller, Comey's predecessor in the role of FBI Director, who was appointed to lead an investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. 

The actor in question is named Peter Coyote, and Variety correctly notes his name elsewhere, including in the headline.  He has been on my radar as a Bay Area stone-cold hard leftist for many years.  Long ago, I watched an early-in-his-career documentary about a commune in which he lived, where he went by the name "Coyote."  Evidently, he added a first name Peter" after leaving the commune.  His birth name is Robert Peter Cohon, which is certainly less dramatic or evocative than Coyote.  His distinctive voice has been used as narrator in many documentaries, including eight made by Ken Burns. 

But I wonder if scenes of Mueller's embarrassing testimony will be part of the mini-series, and if so, if Coyote will accurately portray the awkward befuddlement.

Comey himself will be portrayed by another outspoken Trump-hater, Jeff Daniels, who hysterically claims that if Trump is re-elected, "It is the end of democracy."

The intent to aid Trump's opponent is nakedly obvious, but there is no way that this can be successfully legally challenged as an in-kind campaign contribution owing to the First Amendment.  But I wonder how the project would fare if Comey is indicted for signing off on a warrant submission to the FISA court using the phony Steele Dossier as "verified."  Almost certainly, Comey will claim to be a victim of political persecution, so maybe the broadcast will be an attempt to influence the jury pool, as well as the electorate.

CBS has other things to worry about, though.  It has just destroyed billions of dollars of value for its shareholders, as Anthony D'Alessandro reported on Tuesday at Deadline.com:

In the wake of CBS and Viacom announcing their merger, both companies' shares have dropped roughly 20%. At today's Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit in Beverly Hills, Viacom president and CEO Bob Bakish was asked what exactly was up. When the deal was announced, the combined entity was valued at $30 billion. Now, that figure has dropped to around $23 billion.

"We're deep in integration planning, we haven't closed this deal, people have to take a beat," Bakish said in response to the question by CNBC's Julia Boorstin. "The market will see the value of this company."

The media are all in on driving President Trump from office, either by impeachment or electoral defeat.  An example of the latter comes from CBS — not from the biased news division, but from the entertainment branch of the corporation.  The corporation is investing in a mini-series based on James Comey's self-serving book, A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies and Leadership.

To play leading roles, the network has assembled hard-Left Trump-haters.  Variety (mis)reports:

The CBS Studios miniseries based on James Comey's book "A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies and Leadership" has added another player.

Robert Coyote [sic] has boarded the show to play Robert Mueller, Comey's predecessor in the role of FBI Director, who was appointed to lead an investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. 

The actor in question is named Peter Coyote, and Variety correctly notes his name elsewhere, including in the headline.  He has been on my radar as a Bay Area stone-cold hard leftist for many years.  Long ago, I watched an early-in-his-career documentary about a commune in which he lived, where he went by the name "Coyote."  Evidently, he added a first name Peter" after leaving the commune.  His birth name is Robert Peter Cohon, which is certainly less dramatic or evocative than Coyote.  His distinctive voice has been used as narrator in many documentaries, including eight made by Ken Burns. 

But I wonder if scenes of Mueller's embarrassing testimony will be part of the mini-series, and if so, if Coyote will accurately portray the awkward befuddlement.

Comey himself will be portrayed by another outspoken Trump-hater, Jeff Daniels, who hysterically claims that if Trump is re-elected, "It is the end of democracy."

The intent to aid Trump's opponent is nakedly obvious, but there is no way that this can be successfully legally challenged as an in-kind campaign contribution owing to the First Amendment.  But I wonder how the project would fare if Comey is indicted for signing off on a warrant submission to the FISA court using the phony Steele Dossier as "verified."  Almost certainly, Comey will claim to be a victim of political persecution, so maybe the broadcast will be an attempt to influence the jury pool, as well as the electorate.

CBS has other things to worry about, though.  It has just destroyed billions of dollars of value for its shareholders, as Anthony D'Alessandro reported on Tuesday at Deadline.com:

In the wake of CBS and Viacom announcing their merger, both companies' shares have dropped roughly 20%. At today's Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit in Beverly Hills, Viacom president and CEO Bob Bakish was asked what exactly was up. When the deal was announced, the combined entity was valued at $30 billion. Now, that figure has dropped to around $23 billion.

"We're deep in integration planning, we haven't closed this deal, people have to take a beat," Bakish said in response to the question by CNBC's Julia Boorstin. "The market will see the value of this company."