Texas judge officially admonished for draping courtroom door in black protesting confirmation of Justice Kavanaugh

Trump Derangement Syndrome has led many people into self-destructive behavior, with their self-righteous outrage leading them to take actions that discredit themselves and limit their careers — for example, Kathy Griffin.  A purported comedian is one thing, but a black-robed sitting judge is something quite different.  For good reason, society expects judges to behave at a higher standard than the rest of us as a way of preserving their reputation for fairness and calm consideration of facts.

However, a Texas judge (in Austin, of course) seems to have forgotten his duty to remain above the political fray and appear non-partisan.  Judge John Lipscombe has just been publicly admonished by the State of Texas Commission on Judicial Conduct for draping his courtroom door in black on the day that Justice Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed by the United States Senate for a seat on the Supreme Court of the United States.

I have no doubt that this protest was motivated by hatred for President Trump more than by anything Justice Kavanaugh might have done prior to his confirmation.  The transparently phony furor over allegations about his behavior in high school, totally unsupported by evidence, would never have been taken seriously if he had been nominated by someone other than the Orange Man Bad POTUS.

A local TV reporter in Austin, Jenni Lee, tweeted out a picture of Judge Lipscombe's courtroom door, and that was enough to place his highly unusual gesture on the agenda of the Commission on Judicial Conduct.

After nearly a year of evidence gathering and review, the report was issued, and it is scathing, in the sort of language that such official bodies employ.

How many Trump-supporters — people on the record as, for instance, donors — would feel comfortable facing Judge Lipscombe?  Not many, I would guess.  Can he really carry out his duties with the requisite degree of impartiality?  

Public sanctioning is not something that any judge wants to endure.  But I seriously wonder if the penalty is adequate.  Should such a man retain the vast powers of a judge after having demonstrated such derangement?

Graphic credit: Twitter.

Hat tip: Above the Law.

Trump Derangement Syndrome has led many people into self-destructive behavior, with their self-righteous outrage leading them to take actions that discredit themselves and limit their careers — for example, Kathy Griffin.  A purported comedian is one thing, but a black-robed sitting judge is something quite different.  For good reason, society expects judges to behave at a higher standard than the rest of us as a way of preserving their reputation for fairness and calm consideration of facts.

However, a Texas judge (in Austin, of course) seems to have forgotten his duty to remain above the political fray and appear non-partisan.  Judge John Lipscombe has just been publicly admonished by the State of Texas Commission on Judicial Conduct for draping his courtroom door in black on the day that Justice Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed by the United States Senate for a seat on the Supreme Court of the United States.

I have no doubt that this protest was motivated by hatred for President Trump more than by anything Justice Kavanaugh might have done prior to his confirmation.  The transparently phony furor over allegations about his behavior in high school, totally unsupported by evidence, would never have been taken seriously if he had been nominated by someone other than the Orange Man Bad POTUS.

A local TV reporter in Austin, Jenni Lee, tweeted out a picture of Judge Lipscombe's courtroom door, and that was enough to place his highly unusual gesture on the agenda of the Commission on Judicial Conduct.

After nearly a year of evidence gathering and review, the report was issued, and it is scathing, in the sort of language that such official bodies employ.

How many Trump-supporters — people on the record as, for instance, donors — would feel comfortable facing Judge Lipscombe?  Not many, I would guess.  Can he really carry out his duties with the requisite degree of impartiality?  

Public sanctioning is not something that any judge wants to endure.  But I seriously wonder if the penalty is adequate.  Should such a man retain the vast powers of a judge after having demonstrated such derangement?

Graphic credit: Twitter.

Hat tip: Above the Law.