Physics is racist and sexist?

A new school year is about to begin and along with it comes a new solution to a new problem.  And Stanford University, the Harvard of the West, is proudly taking credit for discovering the problem: that people in science aren't diverse and inclusive enough. Horrors. But, being a renowned research university, it is proudly offering its solution, called: PUWMAS.
 
That's its unprepossessing acronym for Physics Undergraduate Women and Gender Minorities at Stanford, what it calls "Stanford’s first undergraduate group dedicated to forming an inclusive community of underrepresented minorities in physics."
 
Based on its own statements:
 
We have two main missions:
  1. Promote diversity in physics by uniting and uplifting minority voices.
  2. Provide opportunities for personal, academic, and career development.
Congrats to PUWMAS for winning a 2018 Student Activities and Leadership Campus Impact Award for Building Bridges!
 
What does that mean? Well, along with segregated -- err, inclusive and diverse -- study groups and a book club, there will be minority physics classes, presumably because minority physics is different from toxic-majority physics. Or something. 
 
So say Stanford ivory tower academics. 
 
“In the last five to eight years, there’s been a growing awareness about the importance of identity within the physics community,” said Lauren Tompkins, assistant professor of physics and member of the Equity and Inclusion Committee. “Your identity affects your experience as a physicist and even the physics that you do. If we can acknowledge and understand that, it makes us better physicists.”
 
Oh.  So let's look at what a minority physics class looks like. As opposed to say...a majority physics class which teaches just physics.  
 
Physics 41E: The same as Physics 41: Mechanics, which is a required course for physics majors, but with added support. Students from underrepresented groups often don’t have the same level of preparation from high school as their majority peers. The difference in preparation is large enough that it may lead students to drop out of the major but small enough that the kind of support offered by this course can be enough to keep them in.
 
Physics 94SI: Diverse Perspectives in Physics: A seminar course, also initiated by Meyer and Patel, where physics faculty members from diverse backgrounds share the story of their lives and careers. This course meets over lunch and includes Q&A sessions after each presentation.
 
Rising Stars in Physics: Stanford and MIT co-sponsor this workshop that brings together top early career women in physics and astronomy who are interested in careers in academia.
 
In other words, a remedial physics class and identity group-gripe session, for people who got into Stanford. Wow, physics sure has changed. 
 
But this isn't real physics, and the students involved in this feel-good scam will not become physicists, let alone will they understand basic physics if they continue with this curriculum.
  
Which, soon enough, they will attribute to the fault of toxic males. And, of course, the all-purpose explanation for any failure: r-a-a-a-cism!
 
The failed circle will then be complete, but Stanford will certainly offer another failed solution--more money for more underrepresented minorities for more bloated failed social programs--this time in social programs for physics.  In other words, this is the recently dropped College Board's SAT adversity score in another disguise, for physics.  And more students failing physics classes and failing to become physicists will follow.   
 
Meanwhile, the underrepresented male gender minorities have no comment.  Yet.    
 
Also not heard from--yet--are the over represented minority Nobel physics prize winners including the at least 53 Jews, such as Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr, and the at least 17 Asian winners.  Yeah, they're males, so maybe their minority status doesn't count.  Or maybe they're not real minorities.  
 
Also, for some reason, two-time Polish female Nobel physics prize winner Marie Sklodowska Curie was not to invited to join this group, to inspire them.  The other gender physics minorities could not be found.  The Nobel physics prize committee was equally reticent.
A new school year is about to begin and along with it comes a new solution to a new problem.  And Stanford University, the Harvard of the West, is proudly taking credit for discovering the problem: that people in science aren't diverse and inclusive enough. Horrors. But, being a renowned research university, it is proudly offering its solution, called: PUWMAS.
 
That's its unprepossessing acronym for Physics Undergraduate Women and Gender Minorities at Stanford, what it calls "Stanford’s first undergraduate group dedicated to forming an inclusive community of underrepresented minorities in physics."
 
Based on its own statements:
 
We have two main missions:
  1. Promote diversity in physics by uniting and uplifting minority voices.
  2. Provide opportunities for personal, academic, and career development.
Congrats to PUWMAS for winning a 2018 Student Activities and Leadership Campus Impact Award for Building Bridges!
 
What does that mean? Well, along with segregated -- err, inclusive and diverse -- study groups and a book club, there will be minority physics classes, presumably because minority physics is different from toxic-majority physics. Or something. 
 
So say Stanford ivory tower academics. 
 
“In the last five to eight years, there’s been a growing awareness about the importance of identity within the physics community,” said Lauren Tompkins, assistant professor of physics and member of the Equity and Inclusion Committee. “Your identity affects your experience as a physicist and even the physics that you do. If we can acknowledge and understand that, it makes us better physicists.”
 
Oh.  So let's look at what a minority physics class looks like. As opposed to say...a majority physics class which teaches just physics.  
 
Physics 41E: The same as Physics 41: Mechanics, which is a required course for physics majors, but with added support. Students from underrepresented groups often don’t have the same level of preparation from high school as their majority peers. The difference in preparation is large enough that it may lead students to drop out of the major but small enough that the kind of support offered by this course can be enough to keep them in.
 
Physics 94SI: Diverse Perspectives in Physics: A seminar course, also initiated by Meyer and Patel, where physics faculty members from diverse backgrounds share the story of their lives and careers. This course meets over lunch and includes Q&A sessions after each presentation.
 
Rising Stars in Physics: Stanford and MIT co-sponsor this workshop that brings together top early career women in physics and astronomy who are interested in careers in academia.
 
In other words, a remedial physics class and identity group-gripe session, for people who got into Stanford. Wow, physics sure has changed. 
 
But this isn't real physics, and the students involved in this feel-good scam will not become physicists, let alone will they understand basic physics if they continue with this curriculum.
  
Which, soon enough, they will attribute to the fault of toxic males. And, of course, the all-purpose explanation for any failure: r-a-a-a-cism!
 
The failed circle will then be complete, but Stanford will certainly offer another failed solution--more money for more underrepresented minorities for more bloated failed social programs--this time in social programs for physics.  In other words, this is the recently dropped College Board's SAT adversity score in another disguise, for physics.  And more students failing physics classes and failing to become physicists will follow.   
 
Meanwhile, the underrepresented male gender minorities have no comment.  Yet.    
 
Also not heard from--yet--are the over represented minority Nobel physics prize winners including the at least 53 Jews, such as Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr, and the at least 17 Asian winners.  Yeah, they're males, so maybe their minority status doesn't count.  Or maybe they're not real minorities.  
 
Also, for some reason, two-time Polish female Nobel physics prize winner Marie Sklodowska Curie was not to invited to join this group, to inspire them.  The other gender physics minorities could not be found.  The Nobel physics prize committee was equally reticent.