The real abortion extremists are on the Left, not in Alabama

The Left is raising a hullabaloo over an Alabama law passed in the state Legislature restricting abortion solely to cases where the life or health of the mother is seriously endangered.

Here is how the local AL.com is summing up the matter:

After several hours of contentious debate, the Alabama Senate on Tuesday night voted 25-6 to pass what many say will be the strictest abortion ban in the nation. The bill makes abortion a felony in Alabama. A similar measure already passed the Republican-controlled House but controversy erupted last week in the Senate after an attempt to add amendments that would allow exceptions for victims of rape or incest. Another attempt to add rape and incest exceptions on Tuesday also failed and led to a filibuster attempt. Proponents of the measure pushed for a "clean bill" without amendments in order to clear the way to a legal fight in the U.S. Supreme Court and a review of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that legalized abortion. The bill now goes to Gov. Kay Ivey, who will decide whether to sign it into law.

News outlets such as the New York Times, the Associated Press, and NPR have all suggested it's Armageddon for "abortion rights," characterizing it as the work of legislators emboldened by the ascent of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court with a cynical agenda to see the matter taken there to force a revision of Roe v. Wade.  The Times and the Associated Press on their front pages featured above-the-fold photos of a women dressed in Handmaid's Tale red costumes at the Alabama legislative offices as if to get the message across that sex slavery for women was imminent.  Those photos were disguised editorials.  Hysteria, anyone?

Meanwhile, the ACLU is speaking out against the law, too, calling it a violation of federal law and vowing to sue to get it taken off the books.

Really?  No states' rights for Alabama?  Back when the topic was sanctuary cities, the ACLU was all in for states' rights.  ACLU president Susan Herman wrote a piece called "States' Rights Arguments Aren't Just for Segregationists" back in 2017 to argue just that.  Funny how they go off the rails when the topic is abortion, shifting their principles for the topic...

The thing is, the law is not at all extreme, given the voter sentiment in Alabama, and more significantly shifts in public sentiment nationally.

Making abortion less common is perfectly in tune with current prevailing trends in polling, which suggest that voters are growing increasingly more pro-life.  A Marist poll last January showed that a whopping majority (61%) of voters who consider themselves pro-choice favor strong restrictions on abortion, leaving it to the first trimester at most.  The pro-lifers, who likely form a solid majority in Alabama, wouldn't, if they are pro-life, want any abortion at all.  What's more, several states have moved to restrict abortion in what are called "heartbeat" bills, which acknowledge that nobody should be killed who has a beating heart.  The Alabama Legislature's law, which moves a tad farther in this direction, was well within this range of mainstream voter opinion.

What's really extreme is what's been going on on the pro-choice side of things in contrast.  Virginia under blackface Democrat Gov. Ralph Northam attempted to pass a bill allowing abortion up to and beyond the moment of birth, for one.  "The infant would be kept comfortable," Northam assured — ahead of what would amount to a decision to murder him.

Besides the attempt to practically legalize murder in Virginia, there have been other states that have passed measures "to fortify legal protections for the procedure" as the New York Times euphemistically put it — extending abortion up to the moment of birth as well.  New York under its leftist law lit up the World Trade Center to celebrate that far-from-mainstream expansion of abortion "rights."  Meanwhile, individual extremists out there have ramped up extremist acts to stand up for abortion, as Pennsylvania legislator Brian Sims did, attempting to dox pro-life girls, ages 13 and 15, who were praying at a Pennsylvania abortion facility.  He still hasn't apologized.

It's as if abortion is not a thing that can be subject to a political pendulum, or shifting sentiment among voters, or new experiences and perspectives to permit new laws, but something that can only be expanded, widened, super-funded, and eventually forced or taken to the born-baby murder level, which we have actually seen attempts at in Virginia.  There's no such thing as states or voters ever having a right to change their minds, or adjust their laws to match their values.

There's extremism all right, but it's not in Alabama - it's coming from the left. The Alabama law is a bid to restore the right to life of every living baby, rationalizing a very bad trend seen elsewhere - and going with legitimate shifts in public sentiment. The left, meanwhile, is going full bore to legalize ever more killing to very little outcry or discussion.

Image credit: TitiNicola via Wikimedia CommonsCC BY-SA 4.0.

The Left is raising a hullabaloo over an Alabama law passed in the state Legislature restricting abortion solely to cases where the life or health of the mother is seriously endangered.

Here is how the local AL.com is summing up the matter:

After several hours of contentious debate, the Alabama Senate on Tuesday night voted 25-6 to pass what many say will be the strictest abortion ban in the nation. The bill makes abortion a felony in Alabama. A similar measure already passed the Republican-controlled House but controversy erupted last week in the Senate after an attempt to add amendments that would allow exceptions for victims of rape or incest. Another attempt to add rape and incest exceptions on Tuesday also failed and led to a filibuster attempt. Proponents of the measure pushed for a "clean bill" without amendments in order to clear the way to a legal fight in the U.S. Supreme Court and a review of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that legalized abortion. The bill now goes to Gov. Kay Ivey, who will decide whether to sign it into law.

News outlets such as the New York Times, the Associated Press, and NPR have all suggested it's Armageddon for "abortion rights," characterizing it as the work of legislators emboldened by the ascent of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court with a cynical agenda to see the matter taken there to force a revision of Roe v. Wade.  The Times and the Associated Press on their front pages featured above-the-fold photos of a women dressed in Handmaid's Tale red costumes at the Alabama legislative offices as if to get the message across that sex slavery for women was imminent.  Those photos were disguised editorials.  Hysteria, anyone?

Meanwhile, the ACLU is speaking out against the law, too, calling it a violation of federal law and vowing to sue to get it taken off the books.

Really?  No states' rights for Alabama?  Back when the topic was sanctuary cities, the ACLU was all in for states' rights.  ACLU president Susan Herman wrote a piece called "States' Rights Arguments Aren't Just for Segregationists" back in 2017 to argue just that.  Funny how they go off the rails when the topic is abortion, shifting their principles for the topic...

The thing is, the law is not at all extreme, given the voter sentiment in Alabama, and more significantly shifts in public sentiment nationally.

Making abortion less common is perfectly in tune with current prevailing trends in polling, which suggest that voters are growing increasingly more pro-life.  A Marist poll last January showed that a whopping majority (61%) of voters who consider themselves pro-choice favor strong restrictions on abortion, leaving it to the first trimester at most.  The pro-lifers, who likely form a solid majority in Alabama, wouldn't, if they are pro-life, want any abortion at all.  What's more, several states have moved to restrict abortion in what are called "heartbeat" bills, which acknowledge that nobody should be killed who has a beating heart.  The Alabama Legislature's law, which moves a tad farther in this direction, was well within this range of mainstream voter opinion.

What's really extreme is what's been going on on the pro-choice side of things in contrast.  Virginia under blackface Democrat Gov. Ralph Northam attempted to pass a bill allowing abortion up to and beyond the moment of birth, for one.  "The infant would be kept comfortable," Northam assured — ahead of what would amount to a decision to murder him.

Besides the attempt to practically legalize murder in Virginia, there have been other states that have passed measures "to fortify legal protections for the procedure" as the New York Times euphemistically put it — extending abortion up to the moment of birth as well.  New York under its leftist law lit up the World Trade Center to celebrate that far-from-mainstream expansion of abortion "rights."  Meanwhile, individual extremists out there have ramped up extremist acts to stand up for abortion, as Pennsylvania legislator Brian Sims did, attempting to dox pro-life girls, ages 13 and 15, who were praying at a Pennsylvania abortion facility.  He still hasn't apologized.

It's as if abortion is not a thing that can be subject to a political pendulum, or shifting sentiment among voters, or new experiences and perspectives to permit new laws, but something that can only be expanded, widened, super-funded, and eventually forced or taken to the born-baby murder level, which we have actually seen attempts at in Virginia.  There's no such thing as states or voters ever having a right to change their minds, or adjust their laws to match their values.

There's extremism all right, but it's not in Alabama - it's coming from the left. The Alabama law is a bid to restore the right to life of every living baby, rationalizing a very bad trend seen elsewhere - and going with legitimate shifts in public sentiment. The left, meanwhile, is going full bore to legalize ever more killing to very little outcry or discussion.

Image credit: TitiNicola via Wikimedia CommonsCC BY-SA 4.0.