Spain goes left โ€” and probably off the rails

We learned that the socialists won in Spain, but it won't be easy to put a government together, as we see in this report:

Spain's socialist prime minister says he will consider talks to form a new government only with parties that respect the constitution and promote social justice.

Pedro Sánchez declared his party the winner in Sunday's general election, a ballot in which the far-right made inroads for the first time since Spain returned to democratic rule.

Sánchez hinted at a preference for a left-wing governing alliance but his stress on the constitution also sent a warning to Catalan separatists even though he may need their support to be elected by Parliament's lower house to a new term as prime minister.

Translation: Spain is a mess.

The socialists got the most votes, but it translates to 123 of 350 seats.  It takes 176 to have a majority, and nobody is within sight of that number.

What happens now?  The socialists will have to persuade 53 other members to form a government.

It may happen if PODEMOS, the other left party with 57 seats, joins forces with the socialists.  At the same time, these two socialist parties are not as friendly as you may think. 

The biggest loser was the conservative Partido Popular.  They got smacked and down to 66 seats.  The biggest winner was VOX, a far-right party that made its debut with 24 seats.

In reality, the biggest loser was Spain.  The socialists have nothing to say other than just exploit the bad economy and tell people what they want to hear.  It won't get better for a while, if at all!

Last, but not least, aren't you glad that we have an Electoral College — i.e., no multi-party elections that result in chaos as we see in Spain the morning after?

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

We learned that the socialists won in Spain, but it won't be easy to put a government together, as we see in this report:

Spain's socialist prime minister says he will consider talks to form a new government only with parties that respect the constitution and promote social justice.

Pedro Sánchez declared his party the winner in Sunday's general election, a ballot in which the far-right made inroads for the first time since Spain returned to democratic rule.

Sánchez hinted at a preference for a left-wing governing alliance but his stress on the constitution also sent a warning to Catalan separatists even though he may need their support to be elected by Parliament's lower house to a new term as prime minister.

Translation: Spain is a mess.

The socialists got the most votes, but it translates to 123 of 350 seats.  It takes 176 to have a majority, and nobody is within sight of that number.

What happens now?  The socialists will have to persuade 53 other members to form a government.

It may happen if PODEMOS, the other left party with 57 seats, joins forces with the socialists.  At the same time, these two socialist parties are not as friendly as you may think. 

The biggest loser was the conservative Partido Popular.  They got smacked and down to 66 seats.  The biggest winner was VOX, a far-right party that made its debut with 24 seats.

In reality, the biggest loser was Spain.  The socialists have nothing to say other than just exploit the bad economy and tell people what they want to hear.  It won't get better for a while, if at all!

Last, but not least, aren't you glad that we have an Electoral College — i.e., no multi-party elections that result in chaos as we see in Spain the morning after?

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.