Is 'Easter' a dirty word to Earth Day–touting Google?

Is there anything more obnoxious than Google making its choice of doodle topics?  Is there anything that reveals the company's values more?

When you go to the Google home page today, you can see that the people working there have got an elaborate doodle, celebrating Earth Day, a made-up holiday serving leftists and their global warming agenda.  They even wanted to make sure you knew what they had in mind, because the animation is a charming video about assorted wonders of nature, so they add an exhortation at the bottom for us to make 'small changes' for the environment.  Bah.  We will when you will, and you won't, so never mind.  Drop the private jets to Bali, pals, and do as Ocasio-Cortez says and take rail.

Now let's have a look at what they didn't bother to do a doodle about, as noticed by Jack Posobiec yesterday:

They've got space for Earth Day but utterly nothing for the holiest holiday of the Christian religious year?  In the wake of the Notre Dame inferno, which had a lot of its viewers thinking about Easter more intently?  That religion followed by 2.18 billion people, which to Google is a proper Google-sized market share?  They couldn't even cough up some eggs and bunnies?

Let's take a look at how Google justifies it:

Doodles are the fun, surprising, and sometimes spontaneous changes that are made to the Google logo to celebrate holidays, anniversaries, and the lives of famous artists, pioneers, and scientists.

How did the idea for doodles originate?

In 1998, before the company was even incorporated, the concept of the doodle was born when Google founders Larry and Sergey played with the corporate logo to indicate their attendance at the Burning Man festival in the Nevada desert. They placed a stick figure drawing behind the 2nd "o" in the word, Google, and the revised logo was intended as a comical message to Google users that the founders were "out of office.". While the first doodle was relatively simple, the idea of decorating the company logo to celebrate notable events was born.

Two years later in 2000, Larry and Sergey asked current webmaster Dennis Hwang, an intern at the time, to produce a doodle for Bastille Day. It was so well received by our users that Dennis was appointed Google's chief doodler and doodles started showing up more and more regularly on the Google homepage. In the beginning, the doodles mostly celebrated familiar holidays; nowadays, they highlight a wide array of events and anniversaries from the Birthday of John James Audubon to the Ice Cream Sundae.

Over time, the demand for doodles has risen in the U.S. and internationally. Creating doodles is now the responsibility of a team of talented illlustrators (we call them doodlers) and engineers. For them, creating doodles has become a group effort to enliven the Google homepage and bring smiles to the faces of Google users around the world.

How many doodles has Google done over the years?

The team has created over 2000 doodles for our homepages around the world.

Who chooses what doodles will be created and how do you decide which events will receive doodles?

A group of Googlers get together regularly to brainstorm and decide which events will be celebrated with a doodle. The ideas for the doodles come from numerous sources including Googlers and Google users. The doodle selection process aims to celebrate interesting events and anniversaries that reflect Google's personality and love for innovation.

Holidays?  Missed that one.  Quantity?  Yep, they got quantity; they do them all the time.  Brainstorming by a group?  What the snubbing of Easter says is that a lot of them wanted to snub Easter, not just some misfit in the graphics department.  The snubbing was by a full committee of people likely making at least six-figure salaries.

Sebastian Gorka expressed best what this actually means:

Image credit: Google screen grabs.

Is there anything more obnoxious than Google making its choice of doodle topics?  Is there anything that reveals the company's values more?

When you go to the Google home page today, you can see that the people working there have got an elaborate doodle, celebrating Earth Day, a made-up holiday serving leftists and their global warming agenda.  They even wanted to make sure you knew what they had in mind, because the animation is a charming video about assorted wonders of nature, so they add an exhortation at the bottom for us to make 'small changes' for the environment.  Bah.  We will when you will, and you won't, so never mind.  Drop the private jets to Bali, pals, and do as Ocasio-Cortez says and take rail.

Now let's have a look at what they didn't bother to do a doodle about, as noticed by Jack Posobiec yesterday:

They've got space for Earth Day but utterly nothing for the holiest holiday of the Christian religious year?  In the wake of the Notre Dame inferno, which had a lot of its viewers thinking about Easter more intently?  That religion followed by 2.18 billion people, which to Google is a proper Google-sized market share?  They couldn't even cough up some eggs and bunnies?

Let's take a look at how Google justifies it:

Doodles are the fun, surprising, and sometimes spontaneous changes that are made to the Google logo to celebrate holidays, anniversaries, and the lives of famous artists, pioneers, and scientists.

How did the idea for doodles originate?

In 1998, before the company was even incorporated, the concept of the doodle was born when Google founders Larry and Sergey played with the corporate logo to indicate their attendance at the Burning Man festival in the Nevada desert. They placed a stick figure drawing behind the 2nd "o" in the word, Google, and the revised logo was intended as a comical message to Google users that the founders were "out of office.". While the first doodle was relatively simple, the idea of decorating the company logo to celebrate notable events was born.

Two years later in 2000, Larry and Sergey asked current webmaster Dennis Hwang, an intern at the time, to produce a doodle for Bastille Day. It was so well received by our users that Dennis was appointed Google's chief doodler and doodles started showing up more and more regularly on the Google homepage. In the beginning, the doodles mostly celebrated familiar holidays; nowadays, they highlight a wide array of events and anniversaries from the Birthday of John James Audubon to the Ice Cream Sundae.

Over time, the demand for doodles has risen in the U.S. and internationally. Creating doodles is now the responsibility of a team of talented illlustrators (we call them doodlers) and engineers. For them, creating doodles has become a group effort to enliven the Google homepage and bring smiles to the faces of Google users around the world.

How many doodles has Google done over the years?

The team has created over 2000 doodles for our homepages around the world.

Who chooses what doodles will be created and how do you decide which events will receive doodles?

A group of Googlers get together regularly to brainstorm and decide which events will be celebrated with a doodle. The ideas for the doodles come from numerous sources including Googlers and Google users. The doodle selection process aims to celebrate interesting events and anniversaries that reflect Google's personality and love for innovation.

Holidays?  Missed that one.  Quantity?  Yep, they got quantity; they do them all the time.  Brainstorming by a group?  What the snubbing of Easter says is that a lot of them wanted to snub Easter, not just some misfit in the graphics department.  The snubbing was by a full committee of people likely making at least six-figure salaries.

Sebastian Gorka expressed best what this actually means:

Image credit: Google screen grabs.