Unplanned, the film: What took Abby so long?

The just released film Unplanned is "based on a true story," that of Abby Johnson, who worked at a Texas Planned Parenthood clinic for eight years, four of them as its director.  The film begins with Abby's epiphany after watching an ultrasound-guided abortion for the first time...after eight years!  It is hard to believe that, working that long for the organization (she was recruited in college), she was so stunned at seeing the actual process that took place in her clinic many, many times a day, each of those days she worked there and then ran it.  But that is how the story unfolds.

Four years into the story, Abby, who has endured two abortions herself, marries and has a child.  As much of a force for good as this film is, and it most certainly is, it is difficult to believe she had never seen a fetus in utero.  Any young woman who has given birth from the mid-1990s to the present and has had prenatal care has seen those images multiple times by the time her baby is born.  Abby had not witnessed an abortion, but she had to know what a 13-week fetus looks like and know the results of the work performed at her clinic as often as forty times a day.

So intent upon fueling the nation's thirst for unrestricted abortion, PP spent millions to win back the House and Senate in order to guarantee the success of their legalization of abortion throughout a pregnancy up until birth.  The N.Y. Reproductive Health Act allows for late-term abortion, albeit gilded with a few words meant to deceive the truth of it.  Bottom line?  In Virginia, too, a woman can get an abortion as she dilates in preparation to give birth to a full-term baby.  The Born-Alive Survivors Protection Act failed in the Senate this past February.  The Democratic Party is officially pro-infanticide.

The important part of the film is the cruel and deceptive strategies of Planned Parenthood.  It is, above all, a business.  It is a big, powerful, and wealthy corporation whose massive riches come from one procedure: abortion.  And it is a procedure the company hard-sells to every pregnant woman who walks into one of its clinics.  The bulk of its income is from abortion, so it has a vested interest in promoting it.

The film does not address the sale of baby parts to research labs around the world; that might have been too much to take at one sitting.

A curious side note is that PP hired Fusion GPS to represent it and to investigate David Daleiden, who procured numerous undercover videos of PP employees discussing exactly that: the sale of fetal parts and tissue.  Not surprisingly, a San Francisco grand jury failed to indict PP and charged Daleiden with fifteen felonies!  San Francisco, like N.Y., reveres the unrestricted right to abortion.  But Planned Parenthood absolutely does sell fetal tissue and parts.  PP does not need and should not receive federal funding.

Then there is the fact that Planned Parenthood has carried on Margaret Sanger's original plan: the extermination of undesirables.  Sanger was a racist of the worst kind.  She hoped to eliminate a variety of minorities for whom she had contempt.  Blacks are 12% of our population but account for 35% of abortions performed in the U.S.  Sanger would be proud.  Planned Parenthood should be ashamed.

For those of us of a certain age, who had our children before technology gave us a window through which to watch our growing fetuses, too many of us took for granted the PP line that the embryo is just a lump of tissue, unable to feel pain, not remotely yet a person.  Those of us not raised in Catholic homes felt comfortable supporting a woman's right to abortion; no one then conceived that women would choose that option in the third trimester.  Now pregnant women can hear their embryo's heartbeat at six weeks, see him move about, watch him develop.  We can see ultrasounds that have become clearer and clearer, fetal videos set to music, a photographic image of the infant's face before birth.  There can be no more denying the humanity of an embryo or fetus.

Abby Johnson left PP and started a foundation, And Then There Were None, to help abortion workers leave that profession.  So far, she has helped five hundred people do exactly that.  So, in the end she is a heroine, a heroine initially wracked with guilt.  One still has to wonder how, after two abortions herself and the birth of her own daughter, it took her so long to grasp the true nature of the procedure and Planned Parenthood's deceptions that quite literally cajole so many girls and women into ending their pregnancies.

The film does a crucial service:  Planned Parenthood is not a “women's reproductive services” institution, it is an abortion mill.  And it is a big, financially successful, business that preys on the most vulnerable among the female population.  

Most media outlets, print and electronic, have refused to run ads for the film.  That is how determined our leftist media is to further deceive unsuspecting and uninformed citizens who have been led to believe that Planned Parenthood is a righteous organization.  It is nothing of the kind.   The film rests on the religious notion that life begins at conception.  It would have been even more profound if it had as its foundation science as well, which has now proven beyond all doubt that life does indeed begin at that moment.   When does the fetus feel pain?  That is still an unsettled controversy but the latest research suggests that it is  by eight  to ten weeks gestation.   Will that knowledge make a difference to those seeking abortions?  Perhaps.  But you can be sure that Planned Parenthood does not concern itself with such dilemmas.  See the film.

The just released film Unplanned is "based on a true story," that of Abby Johnson, who worked at a Texas Planned Parenthood clinic for eight years, four of them as its director.  The film begins with Abby's epiphany after watching an ultrasound-guided abortion for the first time...after eight years!  It is hard to believe that, working that long for the organization (she was recruited in college), she was so stunned at seeing the actual process that took place in her clinic many, many times a day, each of those days she worked there and then ran it.  But that is how the story unfolds.

Four years into the story, Abby, who has endured two abortions herself, marries and has a child.  As much of a force for good as this film is, and it most certainly is, it is difficult to believe she had never seen a fetus in utero.  Any young woman who has given birth from the mid-1990s to the present and has had prenatal care has seen those images multiple times by the time her baby is born.  Abby had not witnessed an abortion, but she had to know what a 13-week fetus looks like and know the results of the work performed at her clinic as often as forty times a day.

So intent upon fueling the nation's thirst for unrestricted abortion, PP spent millions to win back the House and Senate in order to guarantee the success of their legalization of abortion throughout a pregnancy up until birth.  The N.Y. Reproductive Health Act allows for late-term abortion, albeit gilded with a few words meant to deceive the truth of it.  Bottom line?  In Virginia, too, a woman can get an abortion as she dilates in preparation to give birth to a full-term baby.  The Born-Alive Survivors Protection Act failed in the Senate this past February.  The Democratic Party is officially pro-infanticide.

The important part of the film is the cruel and deceptive strategies of Planned Parenthood.  It is, above all, a business.  It is a big, powerful, and wealthy corporation whose massive riches come from one procedure: abortion.  And it is a procedure the company hard-sells to every pregnant woman who walks into one of its clinics.  The bulk of its income is from abortion, so it has a vested interest in promoting it.

The film does not address the sale of baby parts to research labs around the world; that might have been too much to take at one sitting.

A curious side note is that PP hired Fusion GPS to represent it and to investigate David Daleiden, who procured numerous undercover videos of PP employees discussing exactly that: the sale of fetal parts and tissue.  Not surprisingly, a San Francisco grand jury failed to indict PP and charged Daleiden with fifteen felonies!  San Francisco, like N.Y., reveres the unrestricted right to abortion.  But Planned Parenthood absolutely does sell fetal tissue and parts.  PP does not need and should not receive federal funding.

Then there is the fact that Planned Parenthood has carried on Margaret Sanger's original plan: the extermination of undesirables.  Sanger was a racist of the worst kind.  She hoped to eliminate a variety of minorities for whom she had contempt.  Blacks are 12% of our population but account for 35% of abortions performed in the U.S.  Sanger would be proud.  Planned Parenthood should be ashamed.

For those of us of a certain age, who had our children before technology gave us a window through which to watch our growing fetuses, too many of us took for granted the PP line that the embryo is just a lump of tissue, unable to feel pain, not remotely yet a person.  Those of us not raised in Catholic homes felt comfortable supporting a woman's right to abortion; no one then conceived that women would choose that option in the third trimester.  Now pregnant women can hear their embryo's heartbeat at six weeks, see him move about, watch him develop.  We can see ultrasounds that have become clearer and clearer, fetal videos set to music, a photographic image of the infant's face before birth.  There can be no more denying the humanity of an embryo or fetus.

Abby Johnson left PP and started a foundation, And Then There Were None, to help abortion workers leave that profession.  So far, she has helped five hundred people do exactly that.  So, in the end she is a heroine, a heroine initially wracked with guilt.  One still has to wonder how, after two abortions herself and the birth of her own daughter, it took her so long to grasp the true nature of the procedure and Planned Parenthood's deceptions that quite literally cajole so many girls and women into ending their pregnancies.

The film does a crucial service:  Planned Parenthood is not a “women's reproductive services” institution, it is an abortion mill.  And it is a big, financially successful, business that preys on the most vulnerable among the female population.  

Most media outlets, print and electronic, have refused to run ads for the film.  That is how determined our leftist media is to further deceive unsuspecting and uninformed citizens who have been led to believe that Planned Parenthood is a righteous organization.  It is nothing of the kind.   The film rests on the religious notion that life begins at conception.  It would have been even more profound if it had as its foundation science as well, which has now proven beyond all doubt that life does indeed begin at that moment.   When does the fetus feel pain?  That is still an unsettled controversy but the latest research suggests that it is  by eight  to ten weeks gestation.   Will that knowledge make a difference to those seeking abortions?  Perhaps.  But you can be sure that Planned Parenthood does not concern itself with such dilemmas.  See the film.