Does this Ancestry.com ad 'romanticize' slavery?

Does this Ancestry.com ad 'romanticize' slavery?  I don't see it, but then, I am frequently accused of not being "woke" enough.

USA Today:

Ancestry.com has apologized for an ad critics claim romanticizes the history of slavery.

The ad, which has since been pulled from YouTube by the genealogy testing service, shows a black woman and white man meeting during what appears to be the 1800s.

"Abigail, we can escape to the North," said the man to the woman. "There is a place we can be together, across the border. Will you leave with me?"

The ad then features the tagline "without you, the story stops here."

CNN reports the ad first appeared on YouTube April 2, but didn't catch the attention of social media until Thursday.

Is it that I'm not woke enough, or is it that I'm a normal person who sees something totally different in the ad?

I found the ad touching and sentimental.  My first thought about the controversy was that white supremacists would hit the ceiling because of the portrayal of an interracial couple.

Little could I guess that there were other haters out there with a different agenda.

It could be that even most black people wouldn't think the ad "romanticized" slavery unless someone else pointed it out.  Would it have been unusual at the time for a white man to be in love with a black woman?  I suppose so, but it probably happened a lot more than history records simply because of the opposition of the public — in both North and South — to the existence of an interracial couple. 

Acceptable or not, love is love, and that's what came through in the ad.  But the ad became a target when those who get outraged for a living found an angle they could attack.  Ancestry, bowing to the inevitable backlash, did as it was instructed.

Rather than be "woke" like this, I think I'll go back to sleep.

Does this Ancestry.com ad 'romanticize' slavery?  I don't see it, but then, I am frequently accused of not being "woke" enough.

USA Today:

Ancestry.com has apologized for an ad critics claim romanticizes the history of slavery.

The ad, which has since been pulled from YouTube by the genealogy testing service, shows a black woman and white man meeting during what appears to be the 1800s.

"Abigail, we can escape to the North," said the man to the woman. "There is a place we can be together, across the border. Will you leave with me?"

The ad then features the tagline "without you, the story stops here."

CNN reports the ad first appeared on YouTube April 2, but didn't catch the attention of social media until Thursday.

Is it that I'm not woke enough, or is it that I'm a normal person who sees something totally different in the ad?

I found the ad touching and sentimental.  My first thought about the controversy was that white supremacists would hit the ceiling because of the portrayal of an interracial couple.

Little could I guess that there were other haters out there with a different agenda.

It could be that even most black people wouldn't think the ad "romanticized" slavery unless someone else pointed it out.  Would it have been unusual at the time for a white man to be in love with a black woman?  I suppose so, but it probably happened a lot more than history records simply because of the opposition of the public — in both North and South — to the existence of an interracial couple. 

Acceptable or not, love is love, and that's what came through in the ad.  But the ad became a target when those who get outraged for a living found an angle they could attack.  Ancestry, bowing to the inevitable backlash, did as it was instructed.

Rather than be "woke" like this, I think I'll go back to sleep.