Beto wasn't specific in 2018, either

The Dallas Morning News endorsed Beto O'Rourke last year.  It even paraphrased the Declaration of Independence to make its case:

When, in the course of human events, a people become so divided among themselves that they can no longer engage in meaningful political discourse or even remain civil to one another, it is time to take bold steps forward.

So they endorsed the guy who will bring us together by taking your AR-15 away, defend late-term abortion, and introducing articles of impeachment. 

Since then, the paper has written more and more articles about how unspecific Beto is running for president.

Check out the front-page story from Sunday:

Five weeks into his presidential campaign, Beto O'Rourke still hasn't shaken the rap that he's a bit of a lightweight.

There are no white papers.  He's delivered no major policy speeches.  The section of his campaign website devoted to "vision" reads like a cut-and-paste version of comments he delivers on the stump — more flowery eloquence than nitty-gritty.

You mean that the editorial staff just figured that out?

Later on, the article tells us this:

Even on immigration, a marquee issue for O'Rourke, his tendency toward lofty rhetoric in lieu of specificity can fuel a perception that he's more talk than action.

Really?  More talk than action?

The Dallas Morning News must be having second thoughts or losing readers or both.  I can tell you that the newspaper is getting lighter every morning I pick it up.

In the meantime, we can confirm that this the same unspecific Beto that drove around Texas saying nothing for two years.

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

The Dallas Morning News endorsed Beto O'Rourke last year.  It even paraphrased the Declaration of Independence to make its case:

When, in the course of human events, a people become so divided among themselves that they can no longer engage in meaningful political discourse or even remain civil to one another, it is time to take bold steps forward.

So they endorsed the guy who will bring us together by taking your AR-15 away, defend late-term abortion, and introducing articles of impeachment. 

Since then, the paper has written more and more articles about how unspecific Beto is running for president.

Check out the front-page story from Sunday:

Five weeks into his presidential campaign, Beto O'Rourke still hasn't shaken the rap that he's a bit of a lightweight.

There are no white papers.  He's delivered no major policy speeches.  The section of his campaign website devoted to "vision" reads like a cut-and-paste version of comments he delivers on the stump — more flowery eloquence than nitty-gritty.

You mean that the editorial staff just figured that out?

Later on, the article tells us this:

Even on immigration, a marquee issue for O'Rourke, his tendency toward lofty rhetoric in lieu of specificity can fuel a perception that he's more talk than action.

Really?  More talk than action?

The Dallas Morning News must be having second thoughts or losing readers or both.  I can tell you that the newspaper is getting lighter every morning I pick it up.

In the meantime, we can confirm that this the same unspecific Beto that drove around Texas saying nothing for two years.

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.