The day the Oscars' descent into political madness began

Forty-six years ago, in 1973, Marlon Brando sent Sacheen Littlefeather up on stage at the Oscars to reject his Academy Award Statue for his performance in The Godfather.  Littlefeather, who was born Marie Louise Cruz (not much cachet there, hence the new sobriquet), read a short screed designed to make everyone feel guilty about Native Americans and then departed.  She should have been more prescient and ruminated about domestic violence.  Her father, a Yaqui Apache, was a violent alcoholic who beat the stuffing out of her mother almost daily.

What is so accepted now, the protest/resistance speeches given by virtue-signaling, holier-than-thou "celebrities" who have ruined a once great venue and now threaten to ruin the entire entertainment industry, started that night.  The "culture war" elevated mediocre talent and the unexpected good fortune of those salt-of-the-earth actors, for a few minutes, into a new celestial empyrius where the fires of their outrage were fungible and could be leveraged into their next contract.

Advertising rates have fallen sharply for this once great venue and there is a reason. The preaching, Progressive proselytizing, from poseurs whose opinions with respect to politics are rarely as nuanced as your plumber's, just might be killing this once great venue off for good.

Image credit: ABC/Adam Rose.

Forty-six years ago, in 1973, Marlon Brando sent Sacheen Littlefeather up on stage at the Oscars to reject his Academy Award Statue for his performance in The Godfather.  Littlefeather, who was born Marie Louise Cruz (not much cachet there, hence the new sobriquet), read a short screed designed to make everyone feel guilty about Native Americans and then departed.  She should have been more prescient and ruminated about domestic violence.  Her father, a Yaqui Apache, was a violent alcoholic who beat the stuffing out of her mother almost daily.

What is so accepted now, the protest/resistance speeches given by virtue-signaling, holier-than-thou "celebrities" who have ruined a once great venue and now threaten to ruin the entire entertainment industry, started that night.  The "culture war" elevated mediocre talent and the unexpected good fortune of those salt-of-the-earth actors, for a few minutes, into a new celestial empyrius where the fires of their outrage were fungible and could be leveraged into their next contract.

Advertising rates have fallen sharply for this once great venue and there is a reason. The preaching, Progressive proselytizing, from poseurs whose opinions with respect to politics are rarely as nuanced as your plumber's, just might be killing this once great venue off for good.

Image credit: ABC/Adam Rose.