And now Venezuelans in Peru

What has to happen for Latin American leaders to understand that Venezuela is a regional matter and humanitarian crisis?

The latest is that Peru may be done helping Venezuelans, as Sabrina Martin just wrote:

Óscar Pérez, president of the NGO Unión Venezolana in Peru, will ask the Peruvian government to extend the expiration date for the Temporary Permit to Stay (PTP) and implement a humanitarian visa for vulnerable Venezuelans.

In an interview with the PanAm Post, Pérez added that the decision of the Vizcarra government not to extend the timeframe for the PTPs term should be of concern to all Venezuelans, adding that it was a surprising decision to close the doors to migration.

Óscar Pérez, president of the NGO Unión Venezolana in Peru, will ask the Peruvian government to extend the expiration date for the Temporary Permit to Stay (PTP) and implement a humanitarian visa for vulnerable Venezuelans.

In an interview with the PanAm Post, Pérez added that the decision of the Vizcarra government not to extend the timeframe for the PTPs term should be of concern to all Venezuelans, adding that it was a surprising decision to close the doors to migration.

So Peru is saying "no más" – no more.  I get it.  Peru wants Peruvians to have the jobs. 

We saw something similar with Brazil, Ecuador, and Colombia, the other three countries facing this border issue.  In other words, these countries are saying there are limits to "continental generosity."

Nevertheless, the real issue goes unresolved.  The problem is the Maduro dictatorship and the mess in Venezuela.  We are all watching a sinking ship and people desperately looking for survival. 

The latest is a health crisis or something that Venezuelans in Dallas have been telling me about.  Then I saw this in the Washington Post:

The economic and social crisis in Venezuela is increasingly spilling over its borders, with disease becoming the newest symbol of the disaster.  Venezuela's health-care system has virtually broken down, allowing once-eradicated illnesses such as measles and diphtheria to reemerge in a population facing acute shortages of food and medicine.  Now, a historic outflow of migrants is helping spread infections to other countries.

"Venezuela's crisis has become our own," Manaus Mayor Arthur Virgilio Neto said.

So true.  "Tu problema es mi problema" – your problem is my problem.

Again, the problem lives in Caracas, and his name is Maduro.  When are Latin American leaders going to call for change in Venezuela?

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

What has to happen for Latin American leaders to understand that Venezuela is a regional matter and humanitarian crisis?

The latest is that Peru may be done helping Venezuelans, as Sabrina Martin just wrote:

Óscar Pérez, president of the NGO Unión Venezolana in Peru, will ask the Peruvian government to extend the expiration date for the Temporary Permit to Stay (PTP) and implement a humanitarian visa for vulnerable Venezuelans.

In an interview with the PanAm Post, Pérez added that the decision of the Vizcarra government not to extend the timeframe for the PTPs term should be of concern to all Venezuelans, adding that it was a surprising decision to close the doors to migration.

Óscar Pérez, president of the NGO Unión Venezolana in Peru, will ask the Peruvian government to extend the expiration date for the Temporary Permit to Stay (PTP) and implement a humanitarian visa for vulnerable Venezuelans.

In an interview with the PanAm Post, Pérez added that the decision of the Vizcarra government not to extend the timeframe for the PTPs term should be of concern to all Venezuelans, adding that it was a surprising decision to close the doors to migration.

So Peru is saying "no más" – no more.  I get it.  Peru wants Peruvians to have the jobs. 

We saw something similar with Brazil, Ecuador, and Colombia, the other three countries facing this border issue.  In other words, these countries are saying there are limits to "continental generosity."

Nevertheless, the real issue goes unresolved.  The problem is the Maduro dictatorship and the mess in Venezuela.  We are all watching a sinking ship and people desperately looking for survival. 

The latest is a health crisis or something that Venezuelans in Dallas have been telling me about.  Then I saw this in the Washington Post:

The economic and social crisis in Venezuela is increasingly spilling over its borders, with disease becoming the newest symbol of the disaster.  Venezuela's health-care system has virtually broken down, allowing once-eradicated illnesses such as measles and diphtheria to reemerge in a population facing acute shortages of food and medicine.  Now, a historic outflow of migrants is helping spread infections to other countries.

"Venezuela's crisis has become our own," Manaus Mayor Arthur Virgilio Neto said.

So true.  "Tu problema es mi problema" – your problem is my problem.

Again, the problem lives in Caracas, and his name is Maduro.  When are Latin American leaders going to call for change in Venezuela?

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.