High school antics 1964 – and The War

As a proud graduate from an American high school in the Class of '64, I'll say we most certainly had our moments of fun.  But by the newly created Kavanaugh Standards, most of my fellow male classmates would probably now be eliminated from further success in America.

Yet it was those same classmates and many like them who stood up for their country when it mattered, with large numbers of them entering the armed forces.  Tragically, 58,212 of my fellow veterans – from the Vietnam War – would never even have the problem of being called to account for their behavior in high school or college because they were killed overseas.  Eight women also made the supreme sacrifice.

President Trump, also Class of '64, nails it in today's mob-rule witch-hunt time in America:

"It is a very scary time for young men in America, where you can be guilty of something you may not be guilty of," Trump said.  "This is a very, very – this is a very difficult time.  What's happening here has much more to do than even the appointment of a Supreme Court justice."

Senators are now pontificating that Americans should not trust men and even saying that just because we are male, we all must guilty of something.

This infamous line by Hawaiian Democratic senator Mazie Hirono will long be remembered:

"Guess who is perpetrating all of these kinds of actions[.]  It's the men in this country," Hirono said.  "I just want to say to the men in this country: Just shut up and step up.  Do the right thing, for a change."

She asked "the enlightened men in our country" to "rise up to say, 'We cannot continue the victimization and the smearing of someone like Dr. Ford.'"

News flash, Senator: We now find out that Dr. Ford will be lucky if she avoids a charge of perjury, and it is not as if she wasn't given fair warning in American Thinker.

It is a very ugly time in America.  To add further insult, "white male privilege" is asserted as being evil.  Well, tell that to the 49,830 white men who never made it home.

In the high school classes of the 1960s, men most certainly had a different issue from worrying about the prospect, three or four decades later, of a U.S. senator mocking them or calling them out for something even worse during their high school years.  In those days, we "partied hearty" because we were being swept up in the political ambitions of one of the biggest moral cowards in American history on issues of war and peace: President Lyndon Baines Johnson.

LBJ had been a successful Democratic senator and then president who had lied about relatives fighting at the Alamo.  He sent a generation to fight and die in Southeast Asia – except, of course, for Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.).

When the going got politically tough, this lasting example of a successful Democrat leader, President Johnson, symbolically threw down his rifle and ran from battle.

This was the paragon of virtue, representing the Democratic Party who sent a small select generation of males to fight and die.  This is how The Atlantic put it:

Johnson had "an unfillable hole in his ego," Moyers says.  Feelings of emptiness spurred him to eat, drink, and smoke to excess.  Sexual conquests also helped to fill the void.  He was a competitive womanizer.  When people mentioned Kennedy's many affairs, Johnson would bang the table and declare that he had more women by accident than Kennedy ever had on purpose.

Please, all Democratic senators: Have a modicum of honor and dignity not to declare war on men, or if not, then disavow your past political heroes.  

A good saying from the Bible (am I allowed to make reference to the Bible in today's America?) comes to mind: let him who is without sin cast the first stone.

As a proud graduate from an American high school in the Class of '64, I'll say we most certainly had our moments of fun.  But by the newly created Kavanaugh Standards, most of my fellow male classmates would probably now be eliminated from further success in America.

Yet it was those same classmates and many like them who stood up for their country when it mattered, with large numbers of them entering the armed forces.  Tragically, 58,212 of my fellow veterans – from the Vietnam War – would never even have the problem of being called to account for their behavior in high school or college because they were killed overseas.  Eight women also made the supreme sacrifice.

President Trump, also Class of '64, nails it in today's mob-rule witch-hunt time in America:

"It is a very scary time for young men in America, where you can be guilty of something you may not be guilty of," Trump said.  "This is a very, very – this is a very difficult time.  What's happening here has much more to do than even the appointment of a Supreme Court justice."

Senators are now pontificating that Americans should not trust men and even saying that just because we are male, we all must guilty of something.

This infamous line by Hawaiian Democratic senator Mazie Hirono will long be remembered:

"Guess who is perpetrating all of these kinds of actions[.]  It's the men in this country," Hirono said.  "I just want to say to the men in this country: Just shut up and step up.  Do the right thing, for a change."

She asked "the enlightened men in our country" to "rise up to say, 'We cannot continue the victimization and the smearing of someone like Dr. Ford.'"

News flash, Senator: We now find out that Dr. Ford will be lucky if she avoids a charge of perjury, and it is not as if she wasn't given fair warning in American Thinker.

It is a very ugly time in America.  To add further insult, "white male privilege" is asserted as being evil.  Well, tell that to the 49,830 white men who never made it home.

In the high school classes of the 1960s, men most certainly had a different issue from worrying about the prospect, three or four decades later, of a U.S. senator mocking them or calling them out for something even worse during their high school years.  In those days, we "partied hearty" because we were being swept up in the political ambitions of one of the biggest moral cowards in American history on issues of war and peace: President Lyndon Baines Johnson.

LBJ had been a successful Democratic senator and then president who had lied about relatives fighting at the Alamo.  He sent a generation to fight and die in Southeast Asia – except, of course, for Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.).

When the going got politically tough, this lasting example of a successful Democrat leader, President Johnson, symbolically threw down his rifle and ran from battle.

This was the paragon of virtue, representing the Democratic Party who sent a small select generation of males to fight and die.  This is how The Atlantic put it:

Johnson had "an unfillable hole in his ego," Moyers says.  Feelings of emptiness spurred him to eat, drink, and smoke to excess.  Sexual conquests also helped to fill the void.  He was a competitive womanizer.  When people mentioned Kennedy's many affairs, Johnson would bang the table and declare that he had more women by accident than Kennedy ever had on purpose.

Please, all Democratic senators: Have a modicum of honor and dignity not to declare war on men, or if not, then disavow your past political heroes.  

A good saying from the Bible (am I allowed to make reference to the Bible in today's America?) comes to mind: let him who is without sin cast the first stone.