David Hogg Demands $5 million from Smith & Wesson for 'gun violence research'

David Hogg's gun control children's crusade reached Massachusetts yesterday and ended up demonstrating in front of the headquarters building of Smith & Wesson.

Hogg is demanding $5 million from the gun-manufacturer for "gun violence research."

Washington Times:

The marchers have condemned Smith & Wesson for making the rifle used in the February mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.  The group wants the company to donate $5 million to gun violence research.

The Boston Globe reported David Hogg, a Parkland shooting survivor, called the march empowering and said Massachusetts shows how commonsense gun laws work.

Another group held signs across the street from Smith & Wesson supporting the gun-maker and the Second Amendment.

Smith & Wesson hasn't responded to requests for comment.

Not exactly a ransom demand, but even as a P.R. stunt, it's stupid.  Is there a "gun violence research" outfit that isn't going to skew its findings to call for more gun control?  Not likely.

Smith & Wesson is right to ignore the group.  Blaming Smith & Wesson for the deaths at Parkland is like blaming Ford Motor Co. for a terrorist car bomb.  It just doesn't compute.

Not surprisingly, Hogg went after the NRA following the shooting in Jacksonville yesterday.

 

 

As Breitbart points out, none of the recent "reforms" enacted since the Parkland shooting would have prevented what happened in Florida.

Following the February 14 Parkland high school attack, and at gun controllers' behest, Florida politicians put waiting periods in place for long gun purchases, raised the minimum rifle purchase age to 21, and adopted gun confiscation orders that empower police officers to take away firearms from those deemed to be a threat.  None of these laws prevented Sunday's shooting.

In Maryland, the home state of the shooting suspect, "assault weapons" are banned, "high-capacity" magazines are banned, handgun purchasers have to submit fingerprints to state police.  Moreover, would-be handgun buyers have to acquire a "Handgun Qualification License" before the purchase can be finalized.

None of these laws prevented Sunday's shooting either, so Hogg and his fellow gun controllers are pointing fingers at the NRA.

There's no logic or reason in the argument used by Hogg and his gun grabbers.  There will never be enough laws on the books to prevent violence.  The question, then, is why punish law-abiding citizens with restrictions that don't stop shootings anyway?

 

 

David Hogg's gun control children's crusade reached Massachusetts yesterday and ended up demonstrating in front of the headquarters building of Smith & Wesson.

Hogg is demanding $5 million from the gun-manufacturer for "gun violence research."

Washington Times:

The marchers have condemned Smith & Wesson for making the rifle used in the February mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.  The group wants the company to donate $5 million to gun violence research.

The Boston Globe reported David Hogg, a Parkland shooting survivor, called the march empowering and said Massachusetts shows how commonsense gun laws work.

Another group held signs across the street from Smith & Wesson supporting the gun-maker and the Second Amendment.

Smith & Wesson hasn't responded to requests for comment.

Not exactly a ransom demand, but even as a P.R. stunt, it's stupid.  Is there a "gun violence research" outfit that isn't going to skew its findings to call for more gun control?  Not likely.

Smith & Wesson is right to ignore the group.  Blaming Smith & Wesson for the deaths at Parkland is like blaming Ford Motor Co. for a terrorist car bomb.  It just doesn't compute.

Not surprisingly, Hogg went after the NRA following the shooting in Jacksonville yesterday.

 

 

As Breitbart points out, none of the recent "reforms" enacted since the Parkland shooting would have prevented what happened in Florida.

Following the February 14 Parkland high school attack, and at gun controllers' behest, Florida politicians put waiting periods in place for long gun purchases, raised the minimum rifle purchase age to 21, and adopted gun confiscation orders that empower police officers to take away firearms from those deemed to be a threat.  None of these laws prevented Sunday's shooting.

In Maryland, the home state of the shooting suspect, "assault weapons" are banned, "high-capacity" magazines are banned, handgun purchasers have to submit fingerprints to state police.  Moreover, would-be handgun buyers have to acquire a "Handgun Qualification License" before the purchase can be finalized.

None of these laws prevented Sunday's shooting either, so Hogg and his fellow gun controllers are pointing fingers at the NRA.

There's no logic or reason in the argument used by Hogg and his gun grabbers.  There will never be enough laws on the books to prevent violence.  The question, then, is why punish law-abiding citizens with restrictions that don't stop shootings anyway?