Ryan: Trump will be an 'asset' in midterms

There's a lot of internal debate happening in various GOP campaigns for federal office regarding the man who won't be on the ballot in November, but who will definitely be on voter's minds.

Should candidates run with or run away from Trump? For many candidates, it's a no brainer. They have embraced Trump during their primary campaigns and would welcome an endorsement or a campaign appearance from the president.

But for many incumbents - especially those running in states or congressional districts won by Hillary Clinton in 2016 - the question is more complicated. They can't really disavow the president or their natural base of Republican voters will rebel. But if they appear to be too close to Trump, many independents who oppose the president will be less inclined to vote for them.

Speaker Paul Ryan says that Trump will be an "asset."

The Hill:

Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) called President Trump an asset in the upcoming 2018 midterm elections, saying he has resonated with voters in key states. 

"The president is strong in these states," Ryan said on Saturday at the Wisconsin Republican convention, according to The Associated Press. 

"He's an asset...Whether I'm running around southern Wisconsin or America, nobody is talking about Stormy Daniels. Nobody is talking about Russia. They're talking about their lives and their problems. They're talking about their communities, they're talking about jobs, they're talking about the economy, they're talking about national security," he continued. 

However, Ryan reportedly cautioned Republicans about a potential Democratic "blue wave" in November. 

"The 'blue wave," as they say it, they want to take it all away," he said, the AP reported. 

Republicans are gearing up to defend their majorities in the House and Senate in November. 

The GOP has touted an improved economy and the new tax plan ahead of the November races. 

A CNN poll out earlier this month showed that 57 percent of those surveyed believe the country is doing well, an uptick from 49 percent in February. At the same time, a CBS poll also out this month showed that 66 percent of those polled believe the economy is good. 

Trump has expressed an eagerness to campaign for Republicans ahead of the elections, which are widely expected to be a referendum on his first two years in office. 

Prospects have certainly brightened for Republicans in the last 6 weeks or so. And part of that resurgence is an improvement in the president's approval numbers. In short, Trump is not nearly as much of a drag on many campaigns as he might have been two months ago.

Still, politicians in swing districts must show some caution. The improvement in Trump's numbers are largely due to Republicans "coming home" to support him. He is still underwater with independents and, of course, Democrats.

Democrats are banking heavily on an anti-Trump vote to carry them to victory in November. They still might get that. But Republican candidates who try to steer clear of Trump risk dampening enthusiasm among party faithful for their own campaigns. Since midterms are largely won or lost based on turning out your voters, GOP candidates should think twice about doing anything to alienate Trump voters in their districts.

 

There's a lot of internal debate happening in various GOP campaigns for federal office regarding the man who won't be on the ballot in November, but who will definitely be on voter's minds.

Should candidates run with or run away from Trump? For many candidates, it's a no brainer. They have embraced Trump during their primary campaigns and would welcome an endorsement or a campaign appearance from the president.

But for many incumbents - especially those running in states or congressional districts won by Hillary Clinton in 2016 - the question is more complicated. They can't really disavow the president or their natural base of Republican voters will rebel. But if they appear to be too close to Trump, many independents who oppose the president will be less inclined to vote for them.

Speaker Paul Ryan says that Trump will be an "asset."

The Hill:

Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) called President Trump an asset in the upcoming 2018 midterm elections, saying he has resonated with voters in key states. 

"The president is strong in these states," Ryan said on Saturday at the Wisconsin Republican convention, according to The Associated Press. 

"He's an asset...Whether I'm running around southern Wisconsin or America, nobody is talking about Stormy Daniels. Nobody is talking about Russia. They're talking about their lives and their problems. They're talking about their communities, they're talking about jobs, they're talking about the economy, they're talking about national security," he continued. 

However, Ryan reportedly cautioned Republicans about a potential Democratic "blue wave" in November. 

"The 'blue wave," as they say it, they want to take it all away," he said, the AP reported. 

Republicans are gearing up to defend their majorities in the House and Senate in November. 

The GOP has touted an improved economy and the new tax plan ahead of the November races. 

A CNN poll out earlier this month showed that 57 percent of those surveyed believe the country is doing well, an uptick from 49 percent in February. At the same time, a CBS poll also out this month showed that 66 percent of those polled believe the economy is good. 

Trump has expressed an eagerness to campaign for Republicans ahead of the elections, which are widely expected to be a referendum on his first two years in office. 

Prospects have certainly brightened for Republicans in the last 6 weeks or so. And part of that resurgence is an improvement in the president's approval numbers. In short, Trump is not nearly as much of a drag on many campaigns as he might have been two months ago.

Still, politicians in swing districts must show some caution. The improvement in Trump's numbers are largely due to Republicans "coming home" to support him. He is still underwater with independents and, of course, Democrats.

Democrats are banking heavily on an anti-Trump vote to carry them to victory in November. They still might get that. But Republican candidates who try to steer clear of Trump risk dampening enthusiasm among party faithful for their own campaigns. Since midterms are largely won or lost based on turning out your voters, GOP candidates should think twice about doing anything to alienate Trump voters in their districts.