High school principal apologizes for prom tickets that said 'Party like it's 1776'

A high school principal in New Jersey has apologized for an "insensitive message" on prom tickets that said "Party like it's 1776." 

For those who have grown up recently in the American public school system and are therefore unaware of its significance, the message is an obscure reference to a minor event in world history: the founding of the United States of America.

The message drew immediate fake outrage, so the principal, Dennis Perry, humbly and profusely apologized for his egregious offense.

 

 

Hit and Run:

It's not clear whether any students were actually bothered by the message. Tthe [sic] local news stories don't quote any angry kids, or even concerned parents.  The offended parties seem to be local activists, who said the incident was just another example of Cherry Hill ignoring the needs of students of color:

Lloyd Henderson, president of the Camden County NAACP East chapter, also praised the principal's immediate response but called the incident "another example" of a school culture in which "the African American students' needs are not considered along with the rest of the school."

Two points.  First, the prom will take place at Philadelphia's National Constitution Center.  Given that the Constitution wasn't actually created in 1776 – that would be the Declaration of Independence – perhaps Perry should have suggested his students "party like its 1787."  This call to action would have bothered the same people, but with the added benefit of being historically accurate.

Second, is there any point in history that would feel safe for all students to party?  The original line is "party like it's 1999," from the Prince song "1999."  But gay and trans students might not have felt welcome at the party then.  We could "party like it's 2018," but only if we were prepared to ignore undocumented students' fears.  I guess everybody just has to "party like it's some unspecified point in the idealized future."  I wonder if that fits on Cherry Hill's prom tickets, which are being reprinted with the offensive message scrubbed.

Editor Lifson makes some valid points in an IM to me:

Can Jews now object to WWII-themed parties because of the Holocaust?  Do we have to ignore all history because people have suffered?  Everyone has suffered injustice at some point in history.

No ancient Egypt parties because of Hebrews in slavery?  Definitely no Africa-themed parties because of slavery?  But of course, cultural appropriation dogma says we all have to live in the moment of our own culture.

Overall, what we are dealing with is an incredibly immature – I might even say juvenile – perspective on American history.  Surely, a more rounded perspective would include the extraordinarily important and vital contributions America has made to the betterment of the human race.  When will that start counting for something with the racialists, feminists, immigrant activists, and cultural warriors?

Fact: Human beings live better today because America exists.  If that isn't a reason to throw a party, I don't know what is.

Yes, America's sins – real and perceived – should be taken into account in any study of such a complex and nuanced subject as American history.  But that's the problem with SJWs – if they bothered with complexity and nuance, they wouldn't have a case.  So they deliberately dumb down American history to its lowest level, highlighting evil while completely ignoring the good. 

Perhaps the principal should have apologized for being forced to apologize. 

 

 

A high school principal in New Jersey has apologized for an "insensitive message" on prom tickets that said "Party like it's 1776." 

For those who have grown up recently in the American public school system and are therefore unaware of its significance, the message is an obscure reference to a minor event in world history: the founding of the United States of America.

The message drew immediate fake outrage, so the principal, Dennis Perry, humbly and profusely apologized for his egregious offense.

 

 

Hit and Run:

It's not clear whether any students were actually bothered by the message. Tthe [sic] local news stories don't quote any angry kids, or even concerned parents.  The offended parties seem to be local activists, who said the incident was just another example of Cherry Hill ignoring the needs of students of color:

Lloyd Henderson, president of the Camden County NAACP East chapter, also praised the principal's immediate response but called the incident "another example" of a school culture in which "the African American students' needs are not considered along with the rest of the school."

Two points.  First, the prom will take place at Philadelphia's National Constitution Center.  Given that the Constitution wasn't actually created in 1776 – that would be the Declaration of Independence – perhaps Perry should have suggested his students "party like its 1787."  This call to action would have bothered the same people, but with the added benefit of being historically accurate.

Second, is there any point in history that would feel safe for all students to party?  The original line is "party like it's 1999," from the Prince song "1999."  But gay and trans students might not have felt welcome at the party then.  We could "party like it's 2018," but only if we were prepared to ignore undocumented students' fears.  I guess everybody just has to "party like it's some unspecified point in the idealized future."  I wonder if that fits on Cherry Hill's prom tickets, which are being reprinted with the offensive message scrubbed.

Editor Lifson makes some valid points in an IM to me:

Can Jews now object to WWII-themed parties because of the Holocaust?  Do we have to ignore all history because people have suffered?  Everyone has suffered injustice at some point in history.

No ancient Egypt parties because of Hebrews in slavery?  Definitely no Africa-themed parties because of slavery?  But of course, cultural appropriation dogma says we all have to live in the moment of our own culture.

Overall, what we are dealing with is an incredibly immature – I might even say juvenile – perspective on American history.  Surely, a more rounded perspective would include the extraordinarily important and vital contributions America has made to the betterment of the human race.  When will that start counting for something with the racialists, feminists, immigrant activists, and cultural warriors?

Fact: Human beings live better today because America exists.  If that isn't a reason to throw a party, I don't know what is.

Yes, America's sins – real and perceived – should be taken into account in any study of such a complex and nuanced subject as American history.  But that's the problem with SJWs – if they bothered with complexity and nuance, they wouldn't have a case.  So they deliberately dumb down American history to its lowest level, highlighting evil while completely ignoring the good. 

Perhaps the principal should have apologized for being forced to apologize.