Chicago protesters demand defunding police training academy

Protesters in Chicago staged a "die-in" at city hall demanding an end to funding a $95 million police and fire training academy with the money going instead to "marginalized communities."

Chicago Tribune:

“Rahm supports schools and resources for cops, not for Black and Brown kids,” their mission reads. “We demand a redirecting of this $95 million into Chicago’s most marginalized communities instead. Real community safety comes from fully-funded schools and mental health centers, robust after-school and job-training programs, and social and economic justice. We want investment in our communities, not expanded resources for police.”

This sort of racial extortion is not new to Chicago. Jesse Jackson's Operation PUSH were masters at wringing money from the city and private corporations by threatening boycotts - or worse.

Today, members of the #NoCopAcademy — a movement led by Black youth in Chicago but fueled and organized by a group of multiracial youth— took over Chicago’s City Hall, 121 N. LaSalle Dr., to demand that the mayor invests in black and brown communities and resources for the youth.

The young protestors first disrupted the Chicago City Council meeting and then staged a “die-in” in the City Hall lobby. The group set up cardboard tombstones with the names of people killed in police shootings, like Laquan McDonald, an unarmed Black teen fatallyshot by Chicago cop Jason Van Dyke. The tombstones also had the names of schools, mental health facilities, and social service institutions that have been shut down by the city due to lack of funding.

This sort of disconnect from reality is not uncommon on the left. Better trained police mean fewer police shootings. Better firefighters means more lives saved. It's similar to global warming hysterics going to climate change conferences in private jets or demonstrators against a nuclear power plant driving to the protest in a gasoline powered car. The irony and hypocrisy of activists would be astonishing if they didn't justify it by claiming the moral high ground.

Maria Mora, described as a lead organizer and canvasser with #NoCopAcademy spoke before City Council and said that the group had surveyed 500 residents of West Garfield Park and communities nearby about the project.

“88% are opposed,” she said. Mora added that the majority agreed that building a police academy was not the “best deal for a $95 million investment” in the neighborhood, and 7% need more information.

No biased questions in that survey, eh?

Yes, Chicago has a police problem. Every big city has a police problem, but there are too many shooting incidents involving innocents and too much corrpution in the department to ignore.

But the question is; should there be less training or more training to prepare officers for the most violent streets in America? Should the police get less money or more money to stop the epidemic of gang related violence? 

These are no brainer questions that the activists haven't bothered to ask themselves. No doubt the rest of Chicago's residents feel a lot differently about the issue.

Protesters in Chicago staged a "die-in" at city hall demanding an end to funding a $95 million police and fire training academy with the money going instead to "marginalized communities."

Chicago Tribune:

“Rahm supports schools and resources for cops, not for Black and Brown kids,” their mission reads. “We demand a redirecting of this $95 million into Chicago’s most marginalized communities instead. Real community safety comes from fully-funded schools and mental health centers, robust after-school and job-training programs, and social and economic justice. We want investment in our communities, not expanded resources for police.”

This sort of racial extortion is not new to Chicago. Jesse Jackson's Operation PUSH were masters at wringing money from the city and private corporations by threatening boycotts - or worse.

Today, members of the #NoCopAcademy — a movement led by Black youth in Chicago but fueled and organized by a group of multiracial youth— took over Chicago’s City Hall, 121 N. LaSalle Dr., to demand that the mayor invests in black and brown communities and resources for the youth.

The young protestors first disrupted the Chicago City Council meeting and then staged a “die-in” in the City Hall lobby. The group set up cardboard tombstones with the names of people killed in police shootings, like Laquan McDonald, an unarmed Black teen fatallyshot by Chicago cop Jason Van Dyke. The tombstones also had the names of schools, mental health facilities, and social service institutions that have been shut down by the city due to lack of funding.

This sort of disconnect from reality is not uncommon on the left. Better trained police mean fewer police shootings. Better firefighters means more lives saved. It's similar to global warming hysterics going to climate change conferences in private jets or demonstrators against a nuclear power plant driving to the protest in a gasoline powered car. The irony and hypocrisy of activists would be astonishing if they didn't justify it by claiming the moral high ground.

Maria Mora, described as a lead organizer and canvasser with #NoCopAcademy spoke before City Council and said that the group had surveyed 500 residents of West Garfield Park and communities nearby about the project.

“88% are opposed,” she said. Mora added that the majority agreed that building a police academy was not the “best deal for a $95 million investment” in the neighborhood, and 7% need more information.

No biased questions in that survey, eh?

Yes, Chicago has a police problem. Every big city has a police problem, but there are too many shooting incidents involving innocents and too much corrpution in the department to ignore.

But the question is; should there be less training or more training to prepare officers for the most violent streets in America? Should the police get less money or more money to stop the epidemic of gang related violence? 

These are no brainer questions that the activists haven't bothered to ask themselves. No doubt the rest of Chicago's residents feel a lot differently about the issue.