Questions for Mr. Strzok

Last week, We, the People were made aware of emails and texts exchanged in August 2016 between Mr. Peter Strzok and Ms. Lisa Page, both Federal Bureau of Investigation employees.  The emails and texts were released by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to the House Intelligence Committee and then to the public after committee chairman Devin Nunes threatened to subpoena the documents from the Department of Justice.

In several of the exchanges, Mr. Strzok makes reference to an "insurance policy" – a kind of "poison pill" – that he says needs to be developed and available to disable the Trump presidency in case Trump should be elected.  Mr. Strzok proudly claimed that he was one who could develop and effect such a plan.

Many of us are deeply concerned about the content of these documents.  We hope that in the coming weeks, the Senate and House Intelligence and Judiciary Committees will provide Mr. Strzok an opportunity to provide us all with the full background on the insurance policy and its genesis.

Specifically, we would like to know:  

(1) Is the current Mueller Russia probe investigation in fact the insurance policy that Mr. Strzok envisioned and that has actually been implemented? 

(2) Mr. Strzok makes reference in one of his exchanges to FBI deputy director Andrew McCabe.  Was Mr. McCabe in agreement with Mr. Strzok about the need for an insurance policy?  Did Mr. McCabe suggest the idea?

(3) Had Mr. Strzok ever, either before or after sending his insurance policy texts, been provided suggestions, guidance, or direction by any member of the national Democratic Party or the Hillary election campaign team?

We, the People look forward to hearing the full details of Mr. Strzok's insurance policy that was intended to disable a potential but "unlikely" Trump administration.

Maybe Mr. Strzok's attorneys have provided him with advice and counsel regarding 18 U.S. Code 2384, "Seditious Conspiracy."  For a seditious conspiracy crime to occur, such as a plan to de facto disable the administration of a duly elected president, the plan need only be planned, not actually executed.  But in this case, the Strzok plot may in fact be operating before our very eyes.  It's called the Mueller Russia probe.

Last week, We, the People were made aware of emails and texts exchanged in August 2016 between Mr. Peter Strzok and Ms. Lisa Page, both Federal Bureau of Investigation employees.  The emails and texts were released by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to the House Intelligence Committee and then to the public after committee chairman Devin Nunes threatened to subpoena the documents from the Department of Justice.

In several of the exchanges, Mr. Strzok makes reference to an "insurance policy" – a kind of "poison pill" – that he says needs to be developed and available to disable the Trump presidency in case Trump should be elected.  Mr. Strzok proudly claimed that he was one who could develop and effect such a plan.

Many of us are deeply concerned about the content of these documents.  We hope that in the coming weeks, the Senate and House Intelligence and Judiciary Committees will provide Mr. Strzok an opportunity to provide us all with the full background on the insurance policy and its genesis.

Specifically, we would like to know:  

(1) Is the current Mueller Russia probe investigation in fact the insurance policy that Mr. Strzok envisioned and that has actually been implemented? 

(2) Mr. Strzok makes reference in one of his exchanges to FBI deputy director Andrew McCabe.  Was Mr. McCabe in agreement with Mr. Strzok about the need for an insurance policy?  Did Mr. McCabe suggest the idea?

(3) Had Mr. Strzok ever, either before or after sending his insurance policy texts, been provided suggestions, guidance, or direction by any member of the national Democratic Party or the Hillary election campaign team?

We, the People look forward to hearing the full details of Mr. Strzok's insurance policy that was intended to disable a potential but "unlikely" Trump administration.

Maybe Mr. Strzok's attorneys have provided him with advice and counsel regarding 18 U.S. Code 2384, "Seditious Conspiracy."  For a seditious conspiracy crime to occur, such as a plan to de facto disable the administration of a duly elected president, the plan need only be planned, not actually executed.  But in this case, the Strzok plot may in fact be operating before our very eyes.  It's called the Mueller Russia probe.