AG Sessions: Justice reformer or justice feeb?

He's a feeb.

Sorry, but it has to be said.  We're all thinking it.  Why waste any more time with this disastrous mediocrity?

Like some bizarro-world opposite of the courageous little Dutch boy standing up to the weight of an ocean with a firm finger in a dyke, this anti-charismatic Washington feeb can't muster enough conviction to withdraw his finger from the dyke of lies and old-boy swampism that's for years protected the most notorious group of political gangsters ever to tread upon the Constitution.  And via carefully proscribed special prosecutors (anti-Muellers), subpoenas, and systematic under-oath interviews, what an oceanic, cleansing justice it could be.

Accountability at last:

- for Hillary's infamous email deletions and Benghazi desertion,

- for Ben Rhodes's various deceits in support of Iranian aggression,

- for Samantha Power's massive political unmaskings,

- for Susan Rice's super-heroic lies to dodge Obama administration malfeasance,

- for R. Mueller's and R. Rosenstein's expansion of special prosecutor powers,

- for the high-level leakers trying to destroy the legally elected administration,

- for...hey, don't these people have a boss?

But no.  Mr. Sessions has taken no action; assigned no prosecutors; and at present is only wondering, in his own Hamlet-space, should he or should he not use lie-detectors for suspected leakers.  Is that really a dilemma?

Gregg Jarrett's recent and almost perfect article, arguing for Mr. Sessions's resignation, suggests, too politely, that the former senator is either "incapable or incompetent" in running the Department of Justice.  "Incapable" is quite shy of the mark.  After eight months' dithering, Mr. Sessions is now fully "culpable" of enabling the political gangsterism. 

Nor does "incompetent" quite do justice to the consequences of further thumb-twiddling.  Attorney General Sessions is, to all appearances, a weak, fumbling feeb.  And we are fast losing a rare generational moment to reaffirm the idea of equal laws immune to individual influence.

What is needed is a tough, charismatic crusader in the style of Rudy Giuliani, or perhaps Jeanine Pirro, Herman Cain, or maybe James O'Keefe.  (The point is, there are plenty out there.)  This is no time to settle for Sancho Panza. 

Recalling Rudy Giuliani's prosecution of the heads of the five New York mafia families (they all went to jail), the Washington political gangsters need as comprehensively to be held to account.  Prison if warranted.  Full public exposure and a thorough reputation-nuking at the bare minimum.  We need an effective and passionate attorney general to restore justice and the Justice Department.  We do not need Mr. Sessions.

Before his quickly diminishing reputation evaporates into mist, Jeff Sessions should resign.  Or President Trump should go with his original instincts and remove this ineffectual man.

He's a feeb.

Sorry, but it has to be said.  We're all thinking it.  Why waste any more time with this disastrous mediocrity?

Like some bizarro-world opposite of the courageous little Dutch boy standing up to the weight of an ocean with a firm finger in a dyke, this anti-charismatic Washington feeb can't muster enough conviction to withdraw his finger from the dyke of lies and old-boy swampism that's for years protected the most notorious group of political gangsters ever to tread upon the Constitution.  And via carefully proscribed special prosecutors (anti-Muellers), subpoenas, and systematic under-oath interviews, what an oceanic, cleansing justice it could be.

Accountability at last:

- for Hillary's infamous email deletions and Benghazi desertion,

- for Ben Rhodes's various deceits in support of Iranian aggression,

- for Samantha Power's massive political unmaskings,

- for Susan Rice's super-heroic lies to dodge Obama administration malfeasance,

- for R. Mueller's and R. Rosenstein's expansion of special prosecutor powers,

- for the high-level leakers trying to destroy the legally elected administration,

- for...hey, don't these people have a boss?

But no.  Mr. Sessions has taken no action; assigned no prosecutors; and at present is only wondering, in his own Hamlet-space, should he or should he not use lie-detectors for suspected leakers.  Is that really a dilemma?

Gregg Jarrett's recent and almost perfect article, arguing for Mr. Sessions's resignation, suggests, too politely, that the former senator is either "incapable or incompetent" in running the Department of Justice.  "Incapable" is quite shy of the mark.  After eight months' dithering, Mr. Sessions is now fully "culpable" of enabling the political gangsterism. 

Nor does "incompetent" quite do justice to the consequences of further thumb-twiddling.  Attorney General Sessions is, to all appearances, a weak, fumbling feeb.  And we are fast losing a rare generational moment to reaffirm the idea of equal laws immune to individual influence.

What is needed is a tough, charismatic crusader in the style of Rudy Giuliani, or perhaps Jeanine Pirro, Herman Cain, or maybe James O'Keefe.  (The point is, there are plenty out there.)  This is no time to settle for Sancho Panza. 

Recalling Rudy Giuliani's prosecution of the heads of the five New York mafia families (they all went to jail), the Washington political gangsters need as comprehensively to be held to account.  Prison if warranted.  Full public exposure and a thorough reputation-nuking at the bare minimum.  We need an effective and passionate attorney general to restore justice and the Justice Department.  We do not need Mr. Sessions.

Before his quickly diminishing reputation evaporates into mist, Jeff Sessions should resign.  Or President Trump should go with his original instincts and remove this ineffectual man.