A question that deserves to be answered

Last week, three pickup trucks driven by masked gunmen stopped a bus near Minya, Egypt, south of Cairo.  The bus was filled with dozens of Coptic Christians on a private pilgrimage to the ancient Coptic Saint Samuel Monastery.  The gunmen boarded the bus and, with automatic weapons, killed at least twenty-eight of the Christians.  Many were children. 

According to an article published in yesterday's Wall Street Journal, Mrs. Morkous of Tinley Park, Illinois, a survivor of the ambush, is recovering from gun wounds in a Cairo hospital.  Her husband, along with six other family members, was killed in the attack.  Mrs. Morkous reported that the gunmen who boarded the bus demanded that the occupants recite the Muslim creed, an affirmation that Allah is the only God.  Those who refused were immediately shot to death.

When Christians are murdered by Islamists, often in Allah's name, Muslim religious leaders are asked if it is their belief that Allah really wishes for his followers to commit such killings.

For the edification of the non-Islam world, this is a question that deserves to be answered by leaders of the Muslim faith.

Last week, three pickup trucks driven by masked gunmen stopped a bus near Minya, Egypt, south of Cairo.  The bus was filled with dozens of Coptic Christians on a private pilgrimage to the ancient Coptic Saint Samuel Monastery.  The gunmen boarded the bus and, with automatic weapons, killed at least twenty-eight of the Christians.  Many were children. 

According to an article published in yesterday's Wall Street Journal, Mrs. Morkous of Tinley Park, Illinois, a survivor of the ambush, is recovering from gun wounds in a Cairo hospital.  Her husband, along with six other family members, was killed in the attack.  Mrs. Morkous reported that the gunmen who boarded the bus demanded that the occupants recite the Muslim creed, an affirmation that Allah is the only God.  Those who refused were immediately shot to death.

When Christians are murdered by Islamists, often in Allah's name, Muslim religious leaders are asked if it is their belief that Allah really wishes for his followers to commit such killings.

For the edification of the non-Islam world, this is a question that deserves to be answered by leaders of the Muslim faith.