Lansing toes the Trump line

Of course, President Trump is off to a terrible start, and his every initiative has been stymied, slandered, and stalled.

Well, not all of them.  In deeply blue Lansing, Mich., the city council has just done an about-face on becoming a sanctuary city.  According to MLive, the city council went wobbly when confronted with angry voters and the possible loss of the federal funds.

But other members of the council were concerned that adding "sanctuary city" to a resolution on immigration could negatively impact the city budget and could give people the wrong impression that the city of Lansing is offering protections it doesn't currently have. 

"What bothers me and what concerns me and what goes to my soul... is do we give this false perception to people that there is something out there that is not there," said council member Carol Wood. Referring to the resolution that included the reference to making Lansing a sanctuary city, she said, "this paper won't make any difference" for immigrants living in the U.S. illegally. 

Council member Jody Washington said the city council does not have the authority to declare Lansing a sanctuary city, adding that she didn't think the city "could afford any more confusion" by reaffirming a "Welcoming City" status that was already on the books.

Dozens of people on both sides of the issue stepped forward to criticize the council – those who opposed the concept of sanctuary cities condemned the council's initial decision and encouraged them to eschew the resolution altogether, and supporters of the designation criticized the council for backing down. 

Several critics opposing the sanctuary city resolution – many of whom donned Donald Trump shirts – said the concept was dangerous for the capital city and flies in the face of federal law.

"Trump is going to know exactly what you're doing," said Rose Atkins, one of the people who commented in favor of the council rescinding its resolution. "If you come in here, come in the right way." 

Jim Herbert, the CEO of Lansing-based company Neogen, asked why elected officials "seek to flout the laws intended to keep my family and my employees safe." 

Reports of the death of the Trump phenomenon appear to be premature. 

Of course, President Trump is off to a terrible start, and his every initiative has been stymied, slandered, and stalled.

Well, not all of them.  In deeply blue Lansing, Mich., the city council has just done an about-face on becoming a sanctuary city.  According to MLive, the city council went wobbly when confronted with angry voters and the possible loss of the federal funds.

But other members of the council were concerned that adding "sanctuary city" to a resolution on immigration could negatively impact the city budget and could give people the wrong impression that the city of Lansing is offering protections it doesn't currently have. 

"What bothers me and what concerns me and what goes to my soul... is do we give this false perception to people that there is something out there that is not there," said council member Carol Wood. Referring to the resolution that included the reference to making Lansing a sanctuary city, she said, "this paper won't make any difference" for immigrants living in the U.S. illegally. 

Council member Jody Washington said the city council does not have the authority to declare Lansing a sanctuary city, adding that she didn't think the city "could afford any more confusion" by reaffirming a "Welcoming City" status that was already on the books.

Dozens of people on both sides of the issue stepped forward to criticize the council – those who opposed the concept of sanctuary cities condemned the council's initial decision and encouraged them to eschew the resolution altogether, and supporters of the designation criticized the council for backing down. 

Several critics opposing the sanctuary city resolution – many of whom donned Donald Trump shirts – said the concept was dangerous for the capital city and flies in the face of federal law.

"Trump is going to know exactly what you're doing," said Rose Atkins, one of the people who commented in favor of the council rescinding its resolution. "If you come in here, come in the right way." 

Jim Herbert, the CEO of Lansing-based company Neogen, asked why elected officials "seek to flout the laws intended to keep my family and my employees safe." 

Reports of the death of the Trump phenomenon appear to be premature.