Black C-SPAN caller from dangerous neighborhood fed up with 'bad policemen' narrative

Joyce, an 83-year-old black woman from one of Houston's most dangerous neighborhoods, called into an early morning Sunday show on C-SPAN.  The topic involved how to improve police and community relations.

Joyce didn't address pro football player Colin Kaepernick's now famous protest against the police directly, but she appeared to have a message for him and others like him who don't live in the Sunnyside area of Houston.

It's not the police who need protesting; it's the black criminals terrorizing black communities to blame.

Joyce is on the front lines of this black-on-black war going on in the inner cities.

Obama and Kaepernick have the luxury of kneeling and opining from the sidelines and the G20 summit. Not from predominantly black Sunnyside, where, last February, five people were wounded in a drive-by shooting, including an infant.  In the same three-day period, an elderly woman was robbed and sexually assaulted in her home, an HPD patrol car was hit by gunfire, and a 30-year-old man was shot to death outside a store.

Another resident who has lived in Sunnyside her entire life says she blames the city.  "It's a reflection of neglect.  There are no businesses, no jobs for people, and this is what you get."

Houston has elected Democrat mayors for over 30 years.

Here are some transcribed highlights from Joyce's hard-lived advice for "young black men," the media, and parents.  But I recommend linking to the audio.  Take note when Steve Scully, the C-SPAN moderator, cuts Joyce off when she calls out the media's role in the war on police and puts the focus on her age.  Outrageous.

From C-SPAN, beginning at 18:54 and ending at 23:36:

I live in the most dangerous city in Houston, Texas.  It's called Sunnyside.

We don't need to get the policemen correct; we need to get ourselves correct.

And we keep saying, oh, they just pick on blacks, but we have more crime, and because we have more crime, we need more policemen, but the policemen is presented in such a negative way now, and we need them more than other communities. ...

I talk to the young people, especially the young black men.  I encourage them to obey the policemen – when the policemen stops you, do what the policemen says at that time, and if you think the policemen is wrong, then take it higher[.] ... [R]espect the policemen, put your hands on that steering wheel[.] ... We need our policemen, especially in the black communities.  Think about Chicago.  Think about Detroit.  Think about these places.

And let me say this – and I'm not for any policeman doing wrong, I want that upfront – but every case that have [sic] gone bad, you can trace it back that they did not obey that policeman.

The policeman is not the bad guy.  We've got these people in our communities that are bad.  They steal our stuff.  They break in our homes.  I walked inside my home with a burglar inside my home, so we need the policemen.  And please, media, please stop – every time a bad something happens with a bad policeman, you spotlight it.  What about the thousands of good things that policemen do every day, and it is never on the news? ...

I raised a son as a single mother through divorce.  I didn't take no foolishness out of him.

And I taught him how to respect the policemen, and how to respect the authority and how to respect the next-door neighbor and the teacher.  Our children couldn't do the stuff these children are doing today.  We have to get back to the old way of raising our children.

If Kaepernick or his defender Barack Obama wants to stop the killing, they need to listen to people like Joyce and stop blaming the national anthem, the flag, the military, the police, and the United States of America.

It's no small detail that, unlike Joyce, Obama and Kaepernick have enough money to surround themselves with bodyguards and well armed security personnel as they make police officers, her community's first line of defense, the enemy.

Joyce, an 83-year-old black woman from one of Houston's most dangerous neighborhoods, called into an early morning Sunday show on C-SPAN.  The topic involved how to improve police and community relations.

Joyce didn't address pro football player Colin Kaepernick's now famous protest against the police directly, but she appeared to have a message for him and others like him who don't live in the Sunnyside area of Houston.

It's not the police who need protesting; it's the black criminals terrorizing black communities to blame.

Joyce is on the front lines of this black-on-black war going on in the inner cities.

Obama and Kaepernick have the luxury of kneeling and opining from the sidelines and the G20 summit. Not from predominantly black Sunnyside, where, last February, five people were wounded in a drive-by shooting, including an infant.  In the same three-day period, an elderly woman was robbed and sexually assaulted in her home, an HPD patrol car was hit by gunfire, and a 30-year-old man was shot to death outside a store.

Another resident who has lived in Sunnyside her entire life says she blames the city.  "It's a reflection of neglect.  There are no businesses, no jobs for people, and this is what you get."

Houston has elected Democrat mayors for over 30 years.

Here are some transcribed highlights from Joyce's hard-lived advice for "young black men," the media, and parents.  But I recommend linking to the audio.  Take note when Steve Scully, the C-SPAN moderator, cuts Joyce off when she calls out the media's role in the war on police and puts the focus on her age.  Outrageous.

From C-SPAN, beginning at 18:54 and ending at 23:36:

I live in the most dangerous city in Houston, Texas.  It's called Sunnyside.

We don't need to get the policemen correct; we need to get ourselves correct.

And we keep saying, oh, they just pick on blacks, but we have more crime, and because we have more crime, we need more policemen, but the policemen is presented in such a negative way now, and we need them more than other communities. ...

I talk to the young people, especially the young black men.  I encourage them to obey the policemen – when the policemen stops you, do what the policemen says at that time, and if you think the policemen is wrong, then take it higher[.] ... [R]espect the policemen, put your hands on that steering wheel[.] ... We need our policemen, especially in the black communities.  Think about Chicago.  Think about Detroit.  Think about these places.

And let me say this – and I'm not for any policeman doing wrong, I want that upfront – but every case that have [sic] gone bad, you can trace it back that they did not obey that policeman.

The policeman is not the bad guy.  We've got these people in our communities that are bad.  They steal our stuff.  They break in our homes.  I walked inside my home with a burglar inside my home, so we need the policemen.  And please, media, please stop – every time a bad something happens with a bad policeman, you spotlight it.  What about the thousands of good things that policemen do every day, and it is never on the news? ...

I raised a son as a single mother through divorce.  I didn't take no foolishness out of him.

And I taught him how to respect the policemen, and how to respect the authority and how to respect the next-door neighbor and the teacher.  Our children couldn't do the stuff these children are doing today.  We have to get back to the old way of raising our children.

If Kaepernick or his defender Barack Obama wants to stop the killing, they need to listen to people like Joyce and stop blaming the national anthem, the flag, the military, the police, and the United States of America.

It's no small detail that, unlike Joyce, Obama and Kaepernick have enough money to surround themselves with bodyguards and well armed security personnel as they make police officers, her community's first line of defense, the enemy.