I'm a former rapper, and I don't mind being called a thug

Well, Tamika Mallory, an angry, ideology-driven activist tied to Al Sharpton’s dull umbilical cord, rallied against gun violence with New York politicians Jumaane Williams and Vanessa Gibson.

It was another useless rally that would probably not stop one shooting and might indeed aggravate some future killings.

The angry utopian, useless activists turned against police commissioner Bill Bratton because of his recent negative comments about hip-hop.

The rally came less than a week after the shootings at Irving Square – and after Bratton called hip-hop performers “basically thugs.”

Tamika Mallory, who probably knows nothing about hip-hop, used the rally to insult the commissioner for his “disparaging” remarks.

Now, as a hip-hop artist myself, who did three albums – “The Renegade Jew,” “Da Masta Plan,” and “Lifestylz” – I’d like to say Mallory doesn’t know what she’s talking about.  One of my songs was called “Gangbang.”  There was plenty of violence in my albums, and I was a white, middle-aged Jew.  It is not “disparaging” to bear witness to the shootings in the hip-hop community – Tupac and Biggie Smalls, to mention two.

So give me a break, National Network Types.  Keep throwing your own people under the bus by trying to make them look like innocent schoolboys playing in playground sandboxes.  Many of them really are punks and thugs.  Punish and discipline them with tough love rather than tender encouragement and forgiveness.

Mallory teams up with simpleminded, lyrically challenged Harry Belafonte to say, “Unless you come to the streets, unless you support those who are standing here, unless you are working with our young people, you should shut up.  And you should be ashamed of yourself to collect a check as a public official.”

Well, I say, unless you have been in the rap community, unless you have been to jail and knocked another person out, unless you have been egged on to write more and more violent lyrics, you should be ashamed to defend an art form you know nothing about.

Clumsy, awkward, overly white Bill de Blasio disavowed Bratton’s characterization of rappers last week.  Oh, that’s right – he’s the jerk who felt it’s wrong to search potential criminals for weapons.  Don’t stop and frisk; close your eyes, and let them shoot.

“When our commissioner calls our hip-hop generation, which is a whole generation, thugs, it makes our young men that much more vulnerable.  It makes our young women that much more vulnerable,” said Brooklyn councilwoman Laurie Cumbo.  “And it creates an environment in our communities where we are afraid to love.”

Cumbo’s got to be kidding.  I was a hip-hopper, and I wanted to be called a thug, not some sort of softie.  Jail psychology is to be tough, not soft.  The only thing that can stop violence and encourage love is the creation of walls, values, and traditions.  If you turn the other cheek, you end up with two scarred cheeks.

I’ve been to jail.  Probably unlike you.  Punishment leads to reform.  What moron decided that leniency leads to good behavior rather than repetition of the original bad behavior?

Cumbo couldn’t help but throw a dig at the cops who are trying to protect them: “we are also dealing with the loss of life at the hands of our police department.  And gun violence is wrong no matter how it happens, no matter who has the gun in their hand.”

You can’t hide from blame by blaming the innocent.  The cops are there to protect us from the punks.

I was once a hip-hopper.  I am sick of the liberals pretending that cops are punks.  Criticizing them leads to more murders of innocents.

Liberals are often behind these misunderstandings.  They hate cops because they hate authority because they hate structure, tradition, and rules.

Well, Tamika Mallory, an angry, ideology-driven activist tied to Al Sharpton’s dull umbilical cord, rallied against gun violence with New York politicians Jumaane Williams and Vanessa Gibson.

It was another useless rally that would probably not stop one shooting and might indeed aggravate some future killings.

The angry utopian, useless activists turned against police commissioner Bill Bratton because of his recent negative comments about hip-hop.

The rally came less than a week after the shootings at Irving Square – and after Bratton called hip-hop performers “basically thugs.”

Tamika Mallory, who probably knows nothing about hip-hop, used the rally to insult the commissioner for his “disparaging” remarks.

Now, as a hip-hop artist myself, who did three albums – “The Renegade Jew,” “Da Masta Plan,” and “Lifestylz” – I’d like to say Mallory doesn’t know what she’s talking about.  One of my songs was called “Gangbang.”  There was plenty of violence in my albums, and I was a white, middle-aged Jew.  It is not “disparaging” to bear witness to the shootings in the hip-hop community – Tupac and Biggie Smalls, to mention two.

So give me a break, National Network Types.  Keep throwing your own people under the bus by trying to make them look like innocent schoolboys playing in playground sandboxes.  Many of them really are punks and thugs.  Punish and discipline them with tough love rather than tender encouragement and forgiveness.

Mallory teams up with simpleminded, lyrically challenged Harry Belafonte to say, “Unless you come to the streets, unless you support those who are standing here, unless you are working with our young people, you should shut up.  And you should be ashamed of yourself to collect a check as a public official.”

Well, I say, unless you have been in the rap community, unless you have been to jail and knocked another person out, unless you have been egged on to write more and more violent lyrics, you should be ashamed to defend an art form you know nothing about.

Clumsy, awkward, overly white Bill de Blasio disavowed Bratton’s characterization of rappers last week.  Oh, that’s right – he’s the jerk who felt it’s wrong to search potential criminals for weapons.  Don’t stop and frisk; close your eyes, and let them shoot.

“When our commissioner calls our hip-hop generation, which is a whole generation, thugs, it makes our young men that much more vulnerable.  It makes our young women that much more vulnerable,” said Brooklyn councilwoman Laurie Cumbo.  “And it creates an environment in our communities where we are afraid to love.”

Cumbo’s got to be kidding.  I was a hip-hopper, and I wanted to be called a thug, not some sort of softie.  Jail psychology is to be tough, not soft.  The only thing that can stop violence and encourage love is the creation of walls, values, and traditions.  If you turn the other cheek, you end up with two scarred cheeks.

I’ve been to jail.  Probably unlike you.  Punishment leads to reform.  What moron decided that leniency leads to good behavior rather than repetition of the original bad behavior?

Cumbo couldn’t help but throw a dig at the cops who are trying to protect them: “we are also dealing with the loss of life at the hands of our police department.  And gun violence is wrong no matter how it happens, no matter who has the gun in their hand.”

You can’t hide from blame by blaming the innocent.  The cops are there to protect us from the punks.

I was once a hip-hopper.  I am sick of the liberals pretending that cops are punks.  Criticizing them leads to more murders of innocents.

Liberals are often behind these misunderstandings.  They hate cops because they hate authority because they hate structure, tradition, and rules.