If it's good enough for Benghazi, then it's good enough for slavery

Hillary Clinton says it's "time to move on" from the 2012 Benghazi terrorist attack that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens, Sean Smith, Tyrone Woods, and Glen Doherty.  After the release of an 800-page congressional investigation report into Secretary of State Clinton's response at the time, the presumptive nominee of the Democratic Party stated:

I'll leave it to others to characterize this report, but I think it's pretty clear it's time to move on.

Why not apply Clinton's "get over it" suggestion and her stony-hearted "what difference does it make" wisecrack in 2012 during the Benghazi hearings to the long past slave trade?

Let’s make a deal with Clinton and her black grievance industry pals.  We'll move on from something that happened four years ago, on the anniversary of 9/11, when you get over blaming 21st-century whites for something that began in the 1500s and ended 151 years ago.

In 2000, when asked whether she supports reparations for blacks, Clinton was clearly not moving on:

We have to admit that we haven’t always treated people in our own country fairly. We owe an apology to African-Americans for hundreds of years of slavery.

Clinton lives by the "what's in it for me" philosophy.  Apologizing to the families of the Benghazi victims for her refusal to beef up security after numerous requests, and then allowing the four Americans to die as she played politics with their lives, would yield little return in her bid for the presidency. 

Hillary's not likely to count many of the grief-stricken loved ones among her ardent supporters anyway, so why bother exacerbating her own troubles by confessing that she is an accomplice to murder?  No big payoff there.

On the other hand, pandering to blacks and perpetually reminding them that the "tragedy of race must be made right" in America has been hugely successful in procuring votes for Hillary and Bill, the "first black president."

For candidate Clinton, the past is past only when it's politically expedient.  Hillary's criminal negligence in the Benghazi killings is so yesterday.  By contrast, slavery and race obsession are eternally exploitable.

Hillary Clinton says it's "time to move on" from the 2012 Benghazi terrorist attack that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens, Sean Smith, Tyrone Woods, and Glen Doherty.  After the release of an 800-page congressional investigation report into Secretary of State Clinton's response at the time, the presumptive nominee of the Democratic Party stated:

I'll leave it to others to characterize this report, but I think it's pretty clear it's time to move on.

Why not apply Clinton's "get over it" suggestion and her stony-hearted "what difference does it make" wisecrack in 2012 during the Benghazi hearings to the long past slave trade?

Let’s make a deal with Clinton and her black grievance industry pals.  We'll move on from something that happened four years ago, on the anniversary of 9/11, when you get over blaming 21st-century whites for something that began in the 1500s and ended 151 years ago.

In 2000, when asked whether she supports reparations for blacks, Clinton was clearly not moving on:

We have to admit that we haven’t always treated people in our own country fairly. We owe an apology to African-Americans for hundreds of years of slavery.

Clinton lives by the "what's in it for me" philosophy.  Apologizing to the families of the Benghazi victims for her refusal to beef up security after numerous requests, and then allowing the four Americans to die as she played politics with their lives, would yield little return in her bid for the presidency. 

Hillary's not likely to count many of the grief-stricken loved ones among her ardent supporters anyway, so why bother exacerbating her own troubles by confessing that she is an accomplice to murder?  No big payoff there.

On the other hand, pandering to blacks and perpetually reminding them that the "tragedy of race must be made right" in America has been hugely successful in procuring votes for Hillary and Bill, the "first black president."

For candidate Clinton, the past is past only when it's politically expedient.  Hillary's criminal negligence in the Benghazi killings is so yesterday.  By contrast, slavery and race obsession are eternally exploitable.