Bernie Sanders's America ad: Whiter than the Oscars

Certainly there has to be a better way to propel party candidates for president of the United States to the top than the early – and unusual – Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primaries.  Sure, these states are inhabited by perfectly nice people, but these relatively lightly populated states are not representative of the U.S.  However, the messages geared to these early voters and the momentum winning candidates gain from these highly publicized events carries over to the later Super Tuesday March primary elections and beyond.

So perhaps this is the beginning of an explanation for the skewed content of Democratic presidential aspirant Bernie Sanders's "America" ad, astutely noted by Kristinn Taylor at Gateway Pundit.

To the tune of Simon and Garfunkel's (millennials: they were famous 35 years ago) "America," she states the ad is "Bernie Sanders’ America: No Military, No Police, No Firefighters, Overwhelmingly White and No Muslims."

The studiously crafted one minute ad has no voice over–just edits from ‘America’ over staged scenes and shots from Sanders campaign events.

The Simon and Garfunkel song is an ancient classic. Its use by Sanders is a revealing choice by the aging (74 years old) Sixties radical who is trying to appeal to voters who are focused on their future in the 21st Century.

More revealing is the choice of people featured and not featured in the one-minute ad.

There are no Americans in uniform featured in the Sanders ad; no military, no police and no firefighters. The war on terror and those serving on the frontlines including servicemen and women and first responders don’t matter in Bernie Sanders’ America. (Note: two police officers can be briefly glimpsed behind Sanders in one scene.)

The people in the Sanders ad, whether in tight staged shots or crowd shots, are overwhelmingly white with just a handful of token minorities featured in mostly tight shots.

The first twenty seconds of the ad features only white people. There are nine staged ‘day in the life’ scenes that open the ad–all featuring white men, women and children–including five scenes of white families. Then four campaign crowd scenes are shown with white people.

It is not until the eighteenth scene in the Sanders ad that the first minority is seen with a quick shot of a minority female campaign volunteer working a crowd.

It takes another twenty seconds for other minorities to be prominently seen in the Sanders ad. Then in a span of seven seconds five scenes with minorities are shown interspersed with a shof of Sanders walking in a parade with his white family:  (snip)

The ad would fit right in the Sixties of Sanders’ radical youth when minorities were used as tokens by grandstanding white liberals. (snip)

Oh and by the way: There are no Muslims in Bernie Sanders’ ‘America.’

So while the residents of Iowa and New Hampshire are certainly majority-majority who need police and firefighters and whose residents serve in the Armed Forces, Bernie Sanders didn't think they were worthy to include in his America ad.  Is that his perception of America?

Certainly there has to be a better way to propel party candidates for president of the United States to the top than the early – and unusual – Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primaries.  Sure, these states are inhabited by perfectly nice people, but these relatively lightly populated states are not representative of the U.S.  However, the messages geared to these early voters and the momentum winning candidates gain from these highly publicized events carries over to the later Super Tuesday March primary elections and beyond.

So perhaps this is the beginning of an explanation for the skewed content of Democratic presidential aspirant Bernie Sanders's "America" ad, astutely noted by Kristinn Taylor at Gateway Pundit.

To the tune of Simon and Garfunkel's (millennials: they were famous 35 years ago) "America," she states the ad is "Bernie Sanders’ America: No Military, No Police, No Firefighters, Overwhelmingly White and No Muslims."

The studiously crafted one minute ad has no voice over–just edits from ‘America’ over staged scenes and shots from Sanders campaign events.

The Simon and Garfunkel song is an ancient classic. Its use by Sanders is a revealing choice by the aging (74 years old) Sixties radical who is trying to appeal to voters who are focused on their future in the 21st Century.

More revealing is the choice of people featured and not featured in the one-minute ad.

There are no Americans in uniform featured in the Sanders ad; no military, no police and no firefighters. The war on terror and those serving on the frontlines including servicemen and women and first responders don’t matter in Bernie Sanders’ America. (Note: two police officers can be briefly glimpsed behind Sanders in one scene.)

The people in the Sanders ad, whether in tight staged shots or crowd shots, are overwhelmingly white with just a handful of token minorities featured in mostly tight shots.

The first twenty seconds of the ad features only white people. There are nine staged ‘day in the life’ scenes that open the ad–all featuring white men, women and children–including five scenes of white families. Then four campaign crowd scenes are shown with white people.

It is not until the eighteenth scene in the Sanders ad that the first minority is seen with a quick shot of a minority female campaign volunteer working a crowd.

It takes another twenty seconds for other minorities to be prominently seen in the Sanders ad. Then in a span of seven seconds five scenes with minorities are shown interspersed with a shof of Sanders walking in a parade with his white family:  (snip)

The ad would fit right in the Sixties of Sanders’ radical youth when minorities were used as tokens by grandstanding white liberals. (snip)

Oh and by the way: There are no Muslims in Bernie Sanders’ ‘America.’

So while the residents of Iowa and New Hampshire are certainly majority-majority who need police and firefighters and whose residents serve in the Armed Forces, Bernie Sanders didn't think they were worthy to include in his America ad.  Is that his perception of America?