Obama loses another Democrat on Iran deal

One more slight crack in the solid Democratic wall of support for President Barack Hussein Obama (D)'s Iran deal, as fatally engineered by Secretary of State John Kerry, has appeared.  Representative Albio Sires (D-NJ) has joined two of his other Democratic colleagues in publicly expressing doubts about this deal and the dangers it poses to America's safety.  

Believing that the bill will not be effective in preventing Iran from upgrading its nuclear facilities and acquiring nuclear weapons, Sires released the following statement last Friday.

I am opposed to the current proposed nuclear agreement with Iran, I do not feel the agreement will prevent them from acquiring a nuclear weapon.

The Secretaries of State, Treasury, and Energy testified before the House Foreign Affairs Committee earlier this week, but I am still very doubtful. Iran has spent decades evading international sanctions, promoting terror in the region, and violently oppressing its own people. I am concerned that if the proposed agreement is made official, hardliners within the Iranian regime may hinder its implementation. Most importantly, the time frame of the deal is too short and it is unclear what will happen to Iran’s nuclear program after the initial pressure to comply dissipates and Iran is allowed to enhance its nuclear and weapons capabilities.

Born in Cuba and raised in the United States, Sires understands full well the dangers of guarantees from dictators who promise glory but bring misery.  In addition, he has real-time practical knowledge, as he sits on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, where he is a member of its Subcommittee on Europe, Eurasia and Emerging Threats.  As such, he is well-versed in the real threats posed by Iran and its terrorist allies.  Hearing Kerry's full testimony as part of his committee membership, including Kerry's reluctant admissions about secret side deals he doesn't know about, other unknown parts of the deal, and the weak – practically nonexistent – enforcement mechanisms reinforced Sires's doubts, encouraging him to speak out. 

Now that some Democrats have bravely voiced their opposition, will others follow?

One more slight crack in the solid Democratic wall of support for President Barack Hussein Obama (D)'s Iran deal, as fatally engineered by Secretary of State John Kerry, has appeared.  Representative Albio Sires (D-NJ) has joined two of his other Democratic colleagues in publicly expressing doubts about this deal and the dangers it poses to America's safety.  

Believing that the bill will not be effective in preventing Iran from upgrading its nuclear facilities and acquiring nuclear weapons, Sires released the following statement last Friday.

I am opposed to the current proposed nuclear agreement with Iran, I do not feel the agreement will prevent them from acquiring a nuclear weapon.

The Secretaries of State, Treasury, and Energy testified before the House Foreign Affairs Committee earlier this week, but I am still very doubtful. Iran has spent decades evading international sanctions, promoting terror in the region, and violently oppressing its own people. I am concerned that if the proposed agreement is made official, hardliners within the Iranian regime may hinder its implementation. Most importantly, the time frame of the deal is too short and it is unclear what will happen to Iran’s nuclear program after the initial pressure to comply dissipates and Iran is allowed to enhance its nuclear and weapons capabilities.

Born in Cuba and raised in the United States, Sires understands full well the dangers of guarantees from dictators who promise glory but bring misery.  In addition, he has real-time practical knowledge, as he sits on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, where he is a member of its Subcommittee on Europe, Eurasia and Emerging Threats.  As such, he is well-versed in the real threats posed by Iran and its terrorist allies.  Hearing Kerry's full testimony as part of his committee membership, including Kerry's reluctant admissions about secret side deals he doesn't know about, other unknown parts of the deal, and the weak – practically nonexistent – enforcement mechanisms reinforced Sires's doubts, encouraging him to speak out. 

Now that some Democrats have bravely voiced their opposition, will others follow?