Why do Democrats honor Confederate generals?

It’s time the Democratic Party apologizes to African-Americans for naming U.S. Army forts after Confederate generals.

Colin Flaherty’s recent AT piece, “As long as we're eliminating symbols of past racism...,” calls for the eradication of all white racism as a logical extension of the recent fetish (my word) to ban the Confederate flag.

Bravo!  Why stop with the rebel flag?

Another recent post here suggested that “[a]s Confederate flags come down, so should the monuments that honor the Democrat politicians who overwhelmingly supported The Southern Manifesto of 1956.”  (I wrote it – so, I like the idea.)  

Flags are just cloth.  What about those Confederate generals, who led rebel armies that left 400,000 Union soldiers dead, now honored by having U.S. Army forts named after them?

Who’s responsible for that?

Could it have been those racist Republican politicians?

Well, let’s see:

  1. Fort Lee (Virginia), named for Confederate General Robert E. Lee on 15 July 1917.  The two U.S. senators from Virginia in 1917 then were Claude A. Swanson (D) and Thomas S. Martin (D).
  2. Fort Hood (Texas), named for Confederate General John Bell Hood, officially opened on 18 September 1942.  The Texas senators then were W. Lee “Pappy” O’Daniel (D) and Tom Connally (D).
  3. Fort Polk (Louisiana), named for Confederate General Leonidas Polk, opened in the early 1940s, when Allen J. Ellender (D) and John H. Overton (D) were Louisiana’s U.S. senators.
  4. Fort Benning (Alabama & Georgia), named after pro-secessionist, pro-slavery Confederate General Henry L. Benning, was established in October 1918.  The U.S. senators from Alabama were John H. Bankhead (D) and Oscar Underwood (D).  The U.S. senators from Georgia were Thomas W. Hardwick (D) and M. Hoke Smith (D).
  5. Fort Gordon (Georgia), named after Confederate General John Brown Gordon, opened July 1917, while John H. Bankhead (D) and Oscar Underwood (D) were Georgia’s U.S. senators.
  6. Fort A.P. Hill (Virginia), named after Confederate General A.P. Hill, opened on June 11, 1941, while Harry F. Byrd (D) and Carter Glass (D) were the state’s U.S. senators.
  7. Fort Pickett (Virginia), named after Confederate General George Pickett (of “Pickett’s Charge”), opened for Virginia National Guard maneuvers in early December 1941.  Harry Byrd (D) and Carter Glass (D) were the U.S. senators.

So, among the 12 U.S. senators from 5 states where Confederate generals where honored by having 7 U.S. Army forts named after them, no Republican senators were present.  It was all Ds’ doing.

Yet, according to the Democratic Party’s standard race meme, Republicans are the historical racists.  

The explanation for this displacement of responsibility was articulated by George Orwell, author of 1984: “He who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls the past.”  

Today, the combined efforts of the liberal media, the academy, and progressive Democrats control the present configuration of race-based political memes.

Their purpose is to control the future by distorting the past.  

It’s time the Democratic Party apologizes to African-Americans for naming U.S. Army forts after Confederate generals.

Colin Flaherty’s recent AT piece, “As long as we're eliminating symbols of past racism...,” calls for the eradication of all white racism as a logical extension of the recent fetish (my word) to ban the Confederate flag.

Bravo!  Why stop with the rebel flag?

Another recent post here suggested that “[a]s Confederate flags come down, so should the monuments that honor the Democrat politicians who overwhelmingly supported The Southern Manifesto of 1956.”  (I wrote it – so, I like the idea.)  

Flags are just cloth.  What about those Confederate generals, who led rebel armies that left 400,000 Union soldiers dead, now honored by having U.S. Army forts named after them?

Who’s responsible for that?

Could it have been those racist Republican politicians?

Well, let’s see:

  1. Fort Lee (Virginia), named for Confederate General Robert E. Lee on 15 July 1917.  The two U.S. senators from Virginia in 1917 then were Claude A. Swanson (D) and Thomas S. Martin (D).
  2. Fort Hood (Texas), named for Confederate General John Bell Hood, officially opened on 18 September 1942.  The Texas senators then were W. Lee “Pappy” O’Daniel (D) and Tom Connally (D).
  3. Fort Polk (Louisiana), named for Confederate General Leonidas Polk, opened in the early 1940s, when Allen J. Ellender (D) and John H. Overton (D) were Louisiana’s U.S. senators.
  4. Fort Benning (Alabama & Georgia), named after pro-secessionist, pro-slavery Confederate General Henry L. Benning, was established in October 1918.  The U.S. senators from Alabama were John H. Bankhead (D) and Oscar Underwood (D).  The U.S. senators from Georgia were Thomas W. Hardwick (D) and M. Hoke Smith (D).
  5. Fort Gordon (Georgia), named after Confederate General John Brown Gordon, opened July 1917, while John H. Bankhead (D) and Oscar Underwood (D) were Georgia’s U.S. senators.
  6. Fort A.P. Hill (Virginia), named after Confederate General A.P. Hill, opened on June 11, 1941, while Harry F. Byrd (D) and Carter Glass (D) were the state’s U.S. senators.
  7. Fort Pickett (Virginia), named after Confederate General George Pickett (of “Pickett’s Charge”), opened for Virginia National Guard maneuvers in early December 1941.  Harry Byrd (D) and Carter Glass (D) were the U.S. senators.

So, among the 12 U.S. senators from 5 states where Confederate generals where honored by having 7 U.S. Army forts named after them, no Republican senators were present.  It was all Ds’ doing.

Yet, according to the Democratic Party’s standard race meme, Republicans are the historical racists.  

The explanation for this displacement of responsibility was articulated by George Orwell, author of 1984: “He who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls the past.”  

Today, the combined efforts of the liberal media, the academy, and progressive Democrats control the present configuration of race-based political memes.

Their purpose is to control the future by distorting the past.