Miami-Dade principal's Facebook post exposes liberal nutjobs

A principal at a Florida high school found out the hard way he can't express his opinion without fear of repercussions.

North Miami Senior High School principal Alberto Iber was relieved of his position and "reassigned" for defending the McKinney pool party cop in a harmless Facebook post.

The Superintendent of the Year for 2014, Miami-Dade’s Alberto Carvalho, a close ally of Al Sharpton and Barack Obama, questioned Iber 's judgment and honesty.

Judgment is the currency of honesty…Insensitivity – intentional or perceived – is both unacceptable and inconsistent with our policies, but more importantly with our expectation of common sense behavior that elevates the dignity and humanity of all, beginning with children.

This is the same man who went ballistic when police reports and school disciplinary records detailing Trayvon Martin's criminal activities (stealing, destruction of property, drugs) were leaked to the press in 2012.  Despite the evidence found in Martin’s backpack, he was never charged or arrested – actions that might have saved the wayward student’s life.

Carvalho is also the last person who should be accusing Iber of “not elevating the dignity and humanity of all, beginning with children.”  Not only did he allegedly cheat on his wife with a Miami Herald education reporter a year before he became superintendent in 2008 (he first denied the authenticity of the scandalous e-mails that surfaced but then stated they could be "genuine"), but he was also superintendent in 2009, when a 17-year-old male student stabbed a fellow classmate to death at Coral Gables Senior High School.  Taxpayers paid $1.875 million to settle a lawsuit brought by the murdered student’s parents against the school district for negligence. 

Then, at Miami Killian Senior High School in March 2015, a 17-year-old female student stabbed a 15-year-old boy in the chest, sending him to the hospital with life-threatening injuries.

When asked by a local reporter in 2015 how a student was able to get a deadly weapon into the school, Superintendent Carvalho insisted that his school police officers make random, routine weapons searches, which include the use of metal detectors.

But students in the same report told a different story.  Three or four said they had "never witnessed" random weapons searches, nor had they seen any metal detectors on campus.  The criminals in both incidents were minorities – most likely protected by Obama's order to go easy on students of color, who have higher rates of suspension than their white and Asian counterparts.

In another bizarre twist, Alberto Iber's punishment for speaking his mind prompted Ambrose Sims, a black retired Miami-Dade police officer and gay activist, to reply to Iber's Facebook post.

Sims got a mention in the Miami Herald as an "equal rights activist" who sees Iber as a "a serious part of the problem."  Sims called out Iber for his "racist and ignorant" comment, claiming that the principal has undermined the efforts of the "Black Lives Matter" movement.  Sims's passionate attack on Iber's support of a Texas cop wrestling an uncooperative, irate, non-compliant young woman is odd coming from a retired cop who had his own bouts with two angry women.

In 1995, Ms. Wyn Morris became enraged when her illegally parked car was towed.  Officer Sims was called to Beach Towing and scuffled with the woman before placing her under arrest.  Sims sustained cuts while handcuffing her that bled onto Morris's blouse.  Morris threatened to sue when she found out Sims was HIV-positive.  The lawsuit never happened, and charges were dropped against Morris when she agreed to attend anger management classes.

In 1997, at the same towing company, Sims ran up against a 22-year-old black female, Candace McIntosh.  Now moonlighting for the company, McIntosh and Sims ended up in an altercation when McIntosh unleashed a stream of profanities at the tow truck driver and Sims for wrongfully towing her car.  McIntosh finally paid the towing charge and stopped at the gate to allow her two friends to jump in.  Sims then asked her to drive on, as she was blocking the entrance.  After McIntosh failed to obey Sims's order to move the car, Sims reached in to turn off the ignition.  McIntosh began to move the car, and Sims admitted under oath to punching her.  Sims disentangled himself from the vehicle, and McIntosh was arrested after she sped off.

Here's what Sims, who was uninjured after his encounter, told McIntosh's defense lawyer:

"[R]eplaying the incident in my mind ... the next person who tries that will be shot, and I wish I had done it this time," he told McIntosh's attorney under oath. "You wish that you had shot her?" the attorney responded. "Yes," Sims replied, "because that was the kind of fear that I was in with my life. I would not take the chance again."

In his Facebook response to Iber, Sims asks, "Would it be acceptable for the same police officer to pull out a gun on your teenagers?"

So Sims, the double-minority, double-standard cop, gets to feel threatened by combative, hostile black females and act accordingly without losing his job, while the white Texas cop receives death threats and has to resign.

Likewise, Superintendent Carvalho does the bidding of his friends Obama and Holder by imposing one set of disciplinary rules for blacks and Hispanics and another for whites, ends up with one dead student and one seriously wounded during his tenure, and has the unmitigated hubris to dismiss Iber, a good principal by all accounts, for opining that the Texas cop probably feared for his life and should be "commended."

What a circus.

A principal at a Florida high school found out the hard way he can't express his opinion without fear of repercussions.

North Miami Senior High School principal Alberto Iber was relieved of his position and "reassigned" for defending the McKinney pool party cop in a harmless Facebook post.

The Superintendent of the Year for 2014, Miami-Dade’s Alberto Carvalho, a close ally of Al Sharpton and Barack Obama, questioned Iber 's judgment and honesty.

Judgment is the currency of honesty…Insensitivity – intentional or perceived – is both unacceptable and inconsistent with our policies, but more importantly with our expectation of common sense behavior that elevates the dignity and humanity of all, beginning with children.

This is the same man who went ballistic when police reports and school disciplinary records detailing Trayvon Martin's criminal activities (stealing, destruction of property, drugs) were leaked to the press in 2012.  Despite the evidence found in Martin’s backpack, he was never charged or arrested – actions that might have saved the wayward student’s life.

Carvalho is also the last person who should be accusing Iber of “not elevating the dignity and humanity of all, beginning with children.”  Not only did he allegedly cheat on his wife with a Miami Herald education reporter a year before he became superintendent in 2008 (he first denied the authenticity of the scandalous e-mails that surfaced but then stated they could be "genuine"), but he was also superintendent in 2009, when a 17-year-old male student stabbed a fellow classmate to death at Coral Gables Senior High School.  Taxpayers paid $1.875 million to settle a lawsuit brought by the murdered student’s parents against the school district for negligence. 

Then, at Miami Killian Senior High School in March 2015, a 17-year-old female student stabbed a 15-year-old boy in the chest, sending him to the hospital with life-threatening injuries.

When asked by a local reporter in 2015 how a student was able to get a deadly weapon into the school, Superintendent Carvalho insisted that his school police officers make random, routine weapons searches, which include the use of metal detectors.

But students in the same report told a different story.  Three or four said they had "never witnessed" random weapons searches, nor had they seen any metal detectors on campus.  The criminals in both incidents were minorities – most likely protected by Obama's order to go easy on students of color, who have higher rates of suspension than their white and Asian counterparts.

In another bizarre twist, Alberto Iber's punishment for speaking his mind prompted Ambrose Sims, a black retired Miami-Dade police officer and gay activist, to reply to Iber's Facebook post.

Sims got a mention in the Miami Herald as an "equal rights activist" who sees Iber as a "a serious part of the problem."  Sims called out Iber for his "racist and ignorant" comment, claiming that the principal has undermined the efforts of the "Black Lives Matter" movement.  Sims's passionate attack on Iber's support of a Texas cop wrestling an uncooperative, irate, non-compliant young woman is odd coming from a retired cop who had his own bouts with two angry women.

In 1995, Ms. Wyn Morris became enraged when her illegally parked car was towed.  Officer Sims was called to Beach Towing and scuffled with the woman before placing her under arrest.  Sims sustained cuts while handcuffing her that bled onto Morris's blouse.  Morris threatened to sue when she found out Sims was HIV-positive.  The lawsuit never happened, and charges were dropped against Morris when she agreed to attend anger management classes.

In 1997, at the same towing company, Sims ran up against a 22-year-old black female, Candace McIntosh.  Now moonlighting for the company, McIntosh and Sims ended up in an altercation when McIntosh unleashed a stream of profanities at the tow truck driver and Sims for wrongfully towing her car.  McIntosh finally paid the towing charge and stopped at the gate to allow her two friends to jump in.  Sims then asked her to drive on, as she was blocking the entrance.  After McIntosh failed to obey Sims's order to move the car, Sims reached in to turn off the ignition.  McIntosh began to move the car, and Sims admitted under oath to punching her.  Sims disentangled himself from the vehicle, and McIntosh was arrested after she sped off.

Here's what Sims, who was uninjured after his encounter, told McIntosh's defense lawyer:

"[R]eplaying the incident in my mind ... the next person who tries that will be shot, and I wish I had done it this time," he told McIntosh's attorney under oath. "You wish that you had shot her?" the attorney responded. "Yes," Sims replied, "because that was the kind of fear that I was in with my life. I would not take the chance again."

In his Facebook response to Iber, Sims asks, "Would it be acceptable for the same police officer to pull out a gun on your teenagers?"

So Sims, the double-minority, double-standard cop, gets to feel threatened by combative, hostile black females and act accordingly without losing his job, while the white Texas cop receives death threats and has to resign.

Likewise, Superintendent Carvalho does the bidding of his friends Obama and Holder by imposing one set of disciplinary rules for blacks and Hispanics and another for whites, ends up with one dead student and one seriously wounded during his tenure, and has the unmitigated hubris to dismiss Iber, a good principal by all accounts, for opining that the Texas cop probably feared for his life and should be "commended."

What a circus.