Backlash against omitting Israel from map

The book publisher HarperCollins UK learned a valuable lesson on the dangers of trying to appease in the modern age of instant communications.  As noted here on Thursday, the company literally wiped Israel off the map by omitting Israel on their world atlas because many Muslim nations felt it was "unacceptable" to include it. 

After many news sites and blogs publicized this atrocity, the powerful International Zionist/Jewish Conspiracy/Lobby and their friends and allies angrily scolded them, vowing never to buy their books or other products, HarperCollins quickly tossed off a laughable apology while promising to pulp the remaining maps. 

HarperCollins regrets the omission of the name Israel from their Collins Middle East Atlas. This product has now been removed from sale in all territories and all remaining stock will be pulped. HarperCollins sincerely apologises for this omission and for any offence caused.

No, they didn't demand the return of the error-filled maps or that they too be pulped.  Of course, the biased recipients who paid for them and now own them are quite happy with their distorted maps.  And so the easily offended countries will continue using them, as is their right. 

But HarperCollins was just following a successful marketing plan.  They are willing to succumb to their biased customers, sacrificing truth for a quick sale, as have other publishers before them.  Scholastic Books, the largest publisher of children's books and texts, also omitted Israel from its map of a children's story.  In its defense, the company reprinted the map from the book originally published in Italy.  Last year, an Israeli resident noticed that the company had expanded neighboring Jordan's borders to cover all of Israel and complained.  Oooh, sorry, Scholastic replied. 

Kyle Good, a senior vice president for corporate communications at Scholastic, told The Times of Israel in an email that her company would stop selling the book until the error was amended in the book’s next edition.

“The President of Trade Publishing who was on a plane yesterday returning from Europe has confirmed for me this morning that we are stopping shipments on this title, making the correction and going to reprint. We regret the error[.]”

Scholastic's Kyle Good's official response blandly stated:

As you have probably heard, Thea Stilton and the Blue Scarab Hunt, a title in the Geronimo Stilton series, published by Scholastic,  includes a map that inadvertently omits Israel. Scholastic is immediately stopping shipment on this title, revising the map, and going back to reprint. We regret the omission which was in the original version of the book published in Italy and was translated by our company for English language distribution.

Thank you for your patience and understanding in this matter.

As with the case of HarperCollins, Scholastic's omission was not the result of sloppy editing.  It was quite advertent, quite deliberate whether in the original Italian version or in the translation.  Only when pressed did they change. 

But like it or not, Israel exists.  For eternity.  Scholastic, HarperCollins, all, enjoy these great views of Israel, taken from the International Space Station last week on December 25, 2014.  The green and brown thriving area is Israel.  

The book publisher HarperCollins UK learned a valuable lesson on the dangers of trying to appease in the modern age of instant communications.  As noted here on Thursday, the company literally wiped Israel off the map by omitting Israel on their world atlas because many Muslim nations felt it was "unacceptable" to include it. 

After many news sites and blogs publicized this atrocity, the powerful International Zionist/Jewish Conspiracy/Lobby and their friends and allies angrily scolded them, vowing never to buy their books or other products, HarperCollins quickly tossed off a laughable apology while promising to pulp the remaining maps. 

HarperCollins regrets the omission of the name Israel from their Collins Middle East Atlas. This product has now been removed from sale in all territories and all remaining stock will be pulped. HarperCollins sincerely apologises for this omission and for any offence caused.

No, they didn't demand the return of the error-filled maps or that they too be pulped.  Of course, the biased recipients who paid for them and now own them are quite happy with their distorted maps.  And so the easily offended countries will continue using them, as is their right. 

But HarperCollins was just following a successful marketing plan.  They are willing to succumb to their biased customers, sacrificing truth for a quick sale, as have other publishers before them.  Scholastic Books, the largest publisher of children's books and texts, also omitted Israel from its map of a children's story.  In its defense, the company reprinted the map from the book originally published in Italy.  Last year, an Israeli resident noticed that the company had expanded neighboring Jordan's borders to cover all of Israel and complained.  Oooh, sorry, Scholastic replied. 

Kyle Good, a senior vice president for corporate communications at Scholastic, told The Times of Israel in an email that her company would stop selling the book until the error was amended in the book’s next edition.

“The President of Trade Publishing who was on a plane yesterday returning from Europe has confirmed for me this morning that we are stopping shipments on this title, making the correction and going to reprint. We regret the error[.]”

Scholastic's Kyle Good's official response blandly stated:

As you have probably heard, Thea Stilton and the Blue Scarab Hunt, a title in the Geronimo Stilton series, published by Scholastic,  includes a map that inadvertently omits Israel. Scholastic is immediately stopping shipment on this title, revising the map, and going back to reprint. We regret the omission which was in the original version of the book published in Italy and was translated by our company for English language distribution.

Thank you for your patience and understanding in this matter.

As with the case of HarperCollins, Scholastic's omission was not the result of sloppy editing.  It was quite advertent, quite deliberate whether in the original Italian version or in the translation.  Only when pressed did they change. 

But like it or not, Israel exists.  For eternity.  Scholastic, HarperCollins, all, enjoy these great views of Israel, taken from the International Space Station last week on December 25, 2014.  The green and brown thriving area is Israel.