Sorry, but the editorial page of The New York Times has gone 'loco' on Cuba

We've posted recently about The New York Times calling for an end to the embargo.  As I wrote before, I don't see any evidence that lifting the embargo will help the Cuban people or bring reforms to the island.  On the contrary, lifting the embargo will help the companies owned by the Castro family.

The NY Times has really gone "loco" again on swapping three prisoners for Allan Gross, the U.S. citizen held in Cuba for no reason at all:

There is only one plausible way to remove Mr. Gross from an already complicated equation.

The Obama administration should swap him for three convicted Cuban spies who have served more than 16 years in federal prison.

Is this a joke or what?

Let's remind the editorial writers at The New York Times that the Cubans serving time in our prisons were given a trial with their own defense attorneys.  On the other hand, Mr. Gross had a sham trial in Cuba, a country not known for the rule of law or due process.

So what's this about?  I agree with Dr Carlos Eire, a distinguished Cuban-American and professor at Yale:

What's the point of this essay?  Is it about freeing Alan Gross?  No.  Is it about his unjust imprisonment?  No, of course not.  It's about "normalizing" relations between the U.S. and Castrogonia. This is the most offensive aspect of this latest pro-Castro editorial: when all is said and done, this is not about freeing a victim of the criminal Castro regime, but about turning him into a criminal and about blame-shifting that makes the Castro regime and its spies seem like the "real" victims.    

Absolutely shameless.  Despicable.  And depressing as hell, for just about every self-professed "intellectual" in the United States holds this monstrous newspaper in the highest esteem and allows it to shape their thinking on every issue.

Right on, Carlos!

As we've said before, any talks with Cuba start with the unconditional release of Mr. Gross.  Second, there must be respect for human rights in Cuba.  Once the Cuban government has done that, then let's talk about a future relationship.

P.S. You can hear CANTO TALK here & follow me on Twitter @ scantojr.

We've posted recently about The New York Times calling for an end to the embargo.  As I wrote before, I don't see any evidence that lifting the embargo will help the Cuban people or bring reforms to the island.  On the contrary, lifting the embargo will help the companies owned by the Castro family.

The NY Times has really gone "loco" again on swapping three prisoners for Allan Gross, the U.S. citizen held in Cuba for no reason at all:

There is only one plausible way to remove Mr. Gross from an already complicated equation.

The Obama administration should swap him for three convicted Cuban spies who have served more than 16 years in federal prison.

Is this a joke or what?

Let's remind the editorial writers at The New York Times that the Cubans serving time in our prisons were given a trial with their own defense attorneys.  On the other hand, Mr. Gross had a sham trial in Cuba, a country not known for the rule of law or due process.

So what's this about?  I agree with Dr Carlos Eire, a distinguished Cuban-American and professor at Yale:

What's the point of this essay?  Is it about freeing Alan Gross?  No.  Is it about his unjust imprisonment?  No, of course not.  It's about "normalizing" relations between the U.S. and Castrogonia. This is the most offensive aspect of this latest pro-Castro editorial: when all is said and done, this is not about freeing a victim of the criminal Castro regime, but about turning him into a criminal and about blame-shifting that makes the Castro regime and its spies seem like the "real" victims.    

Absolutely shameless.  Despicable.  And depressing as hell, for just about every self-professed "intellectual" in the United States holds this monstrous newspaper in the highest esteem and allows it to shape their thinking on every issue.

Right on, Carlos!

As we've said before, any talks with Cuba start with the unconditional release of Mr. Gross.  Second, there must be respect for human rights in Cuba.  Once the Cuban government has done that, then let's talk about a future relationship.

P.S. You can hear CANTO TALK here & follow me on Twitter @ scantojr.