Eighteen Years Onward

This year is the eighteenth anniversary of September 11th, when three thousand Americans died at the hands of Islamic terrorists.  The comments made by some, and the lack of complete outrage suggests that many Americans have forgotten how they felt on that horrific day.

People who need a reality check might listen to the song by Darryl Worley, “Have You Forgotten?

“Have you forgotten how it felt that day
To see your homeland under fire
And her people blown away
Have you forgotten when those towers fell
We had neighbors still inside
Going through a living hell
And you say we shouldn't worry 'bout Bin Laden
Have you forgotten.”

Going over remarks over the past year suggests that Americans’ memories have faltered.  Representative Ilhan Omar said, “Here’s the truth. For far too long we have lived with the discomfort of being a second-class citizen and, frankly, I’m tired of it, and every single Muslim in this country should be tired of it. CAIR was founded after 9/11 because they recognized that some people did something.”

This arrogant and inconsiderate comment brushed off the thousands that died on that day. While downplaying terrorism as she spoke to the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) she instead emphasized how Muslim civil liberties had been curtailed. Thankfully, the New York Post stepped up to the plate by blaring on the front cover, a full image of the former Twin Towers on fire in the moments before they collapsed, and saying “Here’s your something — 2,977 people dead by terrorism.”

What was the response of the other Muslim woman elected to Congress? Did she denounce Omar and call her out for her insensitive and dismissive comments?  No! Representative Rashida Tlaib responded to the cover by accusing the Post of taking Omar’s quotes out of context and “endangering” Omar’s life.

To see how low the Democrats have fallen, many of the top Presidential candidates actually defended her.

Bernie Sanders tweeted, “Ilhan Omar is a leader with strength and courage. She won't back down to Trump's racism and hate, and neither will we. The disgusting and dangerous attacks against her must end.” Someone should ask Senator Sanders why he did not categorize Omar’s comments as disgusting.

Elizabeth Warren said, “The President is inciting violence against a sitting Congresswoman -- and an entire group of Americans based on their religion. It's disgusting. It's shameful. And any elected leader who refuses to condemn it shares responsibility for it.”  She is actually correct. Anyone who refuses to condemn Omar shares in the responsibility for brushing the 9/11 terrorist attack under the carpet.

Kamala Harris criticized President Trump, “He's done it again. Putting the safety of a sitting member of Congress at risk & vilifying a whole religion is beyond the pale.”  What is beyond the pale is refusing to acknowledge the safety of Americans, the threat of Islamic terrorism, and how those serving have put their lives on the line to make America safe.

After President Trump denounced the congresswoman and was criticized, then-Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said, “"The bigger question is why aren’t Democrats doing the same thing? It’s absolutely abhorrent the comments that she (Omar) continues to make and has made and they look the other way."

Unfortunately, there was also bipartisan memory lapses.  First responders, police, and fire officials who rushed to the scene of the most horrific attack on U.S. soil since Pearl Harbor have payouts from the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund capped at $7.38 billion. Even though the number of claimants keep climbing, fund officials announced earlier this year that compensation would be reduced to eligible claimants by as much as 70 percent until more money is made available.

Just to recap, about 410,000 people were exposed to contaminants at Ground Zero, including 90,000 first-responders, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

First Responders came to Washington to ask for help in June of this year. Comedian Jon Stewart said what should have been on every American’s mind: first responders and their families came to Washington for the hearing, only to face a nearly deserted dais. "I can't help but think what an incredible metaphor this room is for the entire process getting health care and benefits for 9/11 first responders have come to -- behind me a filled room of 9/11 first responders and in front of me a nearly empty Congress. Sick and dying, they brought themselves down here to speak, to no one. It's shameful."

The graphic of empty congressional chairs was disgusting. The rationale by those in Congress is repulsive.  The explanation: the hearing had not been slated to take place before the whole Judiciary Committee, but was being held before the subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. The subcommittee has 14 members, while the full committee has 41 members. Too bad the other 27 members could not find the time to listen to the pleas of the First Responders.

Ailing Luis Alvarez, a retired New York Police Department bomb squad detective who worked at Ground Zero after the fall of the Twin Towers reminded every American, "You all said you would never forget. Well, I'm here to make sure that you don't.” The next day a House panel unanimously passed a bill permanently reauthorizing the fund. The Senate also passed the bill by a vote of 97 to 2.

Americans should be tired of hearing excuses for what the Islamic Jihadists did.  They should also remember not only the victims of the terrorist attacks, but those who were willing to sacrifice their lives while saving others. People should never forget the families who lost a son, daughter, mother, father, brother, sister, or friend.  They should never forget those who died on that horrific day, and they should never forget the first responders’ heroism. 

The author writes for American Thinker.  She has done book reviews, author interviews, and has written a number of national security, political, and foreign policy articles.

This year is the eighteenth anniversary of September 11th, when three thousand Americans died at the hands of Islamic terrorists.  The comments made by some, and the lack of complete outrage suggests that many Americans have forgotten how they felt on that horrific day.

People who need a reality check might listen to the song by Darryl Worley, “Have You Forgotten?

“Have you forgotten how it felt that day
To see your homeland under fire
And her people blown away
Have you forgotten when those towers fell
We had neighbors still inside
Going through a living hell
And you say we shouldn't worry 'bout Bin Laden
Have you forgotten.”

Going over remarks over the past year suggests that Americans’ memories have faltered.  Representative Ilhan Omar said, “Here’s the truth. For far too long we have lived with the discomfort of being a second-class citizen and, frankly, I’m tired of it, and every single Muslim in this country should be tired of it. CAIR was founded after 9/11 because they recognized that some people did something.”

This arrogant and inconsiderate comment brushed off the thousands that died on that day. While downplaying terrorism as she spoke to the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) she instead emphasized how Muslim civil liberties had been curtailed. Thankfully, the New York Post stepped up to the plate by blaring on the front cover, a full image of the former Twin Towers on fire in the moments before they collapsed, and saying “Here’s your something — 2,977 people dead by terrorism.”

What was the response of the other Muslim woman elected to Congress? Did she denounce Omar and call her out for her insensitive and dismissive comments?  No! Representative Rashida Tlaib responded to the cover by accusing the Post of taking Omar’s quotes out of context and “endangering” Omar’s life.

To see how low the Democrats have fallen, many of the top Presidential candidates actually defended her.

Bernie Sanders tweeted, “Ilhan Omar is a leader with strength and courage. She won't back down to Trump's racism and hate, and neither will we. The disgusting and dangerous attacks against her must end.” Someone should ask Senator Sanders why he did not categorize Omar’s comments as disgusting.

Elizabeth Warren said, “The President is inciting violence against a sitting Congresswoman -- and an entire group of Americans based on their religion. It's disgusting. It's shameful. And any elected leader who refuses to condemn it shares responsibility for it.”  She is actually correct. Anyone who refuses to condemn Omar shares in the responsibility for brushing the 9/11 terrorist attack under the carpet.

Kamala Harris criticized President Trump, “He's done it again. Putting the safety of a sitting member of Congress at risk & vilifying a whole religion is beyond the pale.”  What is beyond the pale is refusing to acknowledge the safety of Americans, the threat of Islamic terrorism, and how those serving have put their lives on the line to make America safe.

After President Trump denounced the congresswoman and was criticized, then-Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said, “"The bigger question is why aren’t Democrats doing the same thing? It’s absolutely abhorrent the comments that she (Omar) continues to make and has made and they look the other way."

Unfortunately, there was also bipartisan memory lapses.  First responders, police, and fire officials who rushed to the scene of the most horrific attack on U.S. soil since Pearl Harbor have payouts from the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund capped at $7.38 billion. Even though the number of claimants keep climbing, fund officials announced earlier this year that compensation would be reduced to eligible claimants by as much as 70 percent until more money is made available.

Just to recap, about 410,000 people were exposed to contaminants at Ground Zero, including 90,000 first-responders, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

First Responders came to Washington to ask for help in June of this year. Comedian Jon Stewart said what should have been on every American’s mind: first responders and their families came to Washington for the hearing, only to face a nearly deserted dais. "I can't help but think what an incredible metaphor this room is for the entire process getting health care and benefits for 9/11 first responders have come to -- behind me a filled room of 9/11 first responders and in front of me a nearly empty Congress. Sick and dying, they brought themselves down here to speak, to no one. It's shameful."

The graphic of empty congressional chairs was disgusting. The rationale by those in Congress is repulsive.  The explanation: the hearing had not been slated to take place before the whole Judiciary Committee, but was being held before the subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. The subcommittee has 14 members, while the full committee has 41 members. Too bad the other 27 members could not find the time to listen to the pleas of the First Responders.

Ailing Luis Alvarez, a retired New York Police Department bomb squad detective who worked at Ground Zero after the fall of the Twin Towers reminded every American, "You all said you would never forget. Well, I'm here to make sure that you don't.” The next day a House panel unanimously passed a bill permanently reauthorizing the fund. The Senate also passed the bill by a vote of 97 to 2.

Americans should be tired of hearing excuses for what the Islamic Jihadists did.  They should also remember not only the victims of the terrorist attacks, but those who were willing to sacrifice their lives while saving others. People should never forget the families who lost a son, daughter, mother, father, brother, sister, or friend.  They should never forget those who died on that horrific day, and they should never forget the first responders’ heroism. 

The author writes for American Thinker.  She has done book reviews, author interviews, and has written a number of national security, political, and foreign policy articles.