Wolf Blitzer says the press 'loves the American people'

If Wolf Blitzer says so, it's got to be correct, right?

Appearing on a panel with David Gregory and Julie Hirschfeld Davis, Blitzer responded to Donald Trump's most recent broadside against the media, which included a tweet saying the media are America's "biggest enemy."

If Wolf Blitzer says so, it's got to be correct, right?

Appearing on a panel with David Gregory and Julie Hirschfeld Davis, Blitzer responded to Donald Trump's most recent broadside against the media, which included a tweet saying the media are America's "biggest enemy."

 

 

Blitzer's feelings were obviously hurt.

Washington Free Beacon:

CNN analyst David Gregory attacked Trump for being unoriginal, saying all politicians don't like the press.

"Everybody's always criticizing us and not happy with our coverage, whether it was President Clinton or President Bush or President – they're all criticized," Blitzer said.

Blitzer went on to say a lot of Trump's supporters believed the charge, which was "a really, really awful situation."

"We are not the enemy of the American people.  We love the American people," he said.

Trump has made attacking the press a hallmark of his presidency, often referring to stories he characterizes as inaccurate or unfair as "fake news."

The media may not be the "biggest enemy" of the American people.  Indeed, it's an outrageously stupid thing to say.  But do the media really "love" us?

Perhaps as a master loves a dog, yes. T hey despise us when we mess the carpet or chew up their favorite slippers – or refuse to believe in things they believe in or vote for the wrong person – but ultimately, they love us like a favorite puppy.

The media's job is to report what's going on.  It's a ridiculously easy craft to master.  In the old days, political reporters were usually drawn from the ranks of sports reporters because of their skill in reporting horse races and pennant races.  High school graduates were welcome, and very few journalists went to college.

All that's changed today.  Now news stories must be infused with a reporter's opinion.  There must be drama – heroes and villains, good guys and bad guys – in order to attract readers and, thus, advertising.

It's apparent that the media resent being called out for their bias.  Blitzer's statement of "love" for the American people extends only as far as we agree with him and his ilk about everything.  When we point out inaccuracies or bias, they bristle.  When someone accuses them of promoting "fake news," their feelings are hurt.

You would think Blitzer and the rest of the media would get the message, but they never do.