Restructuring specialized high schools in New York

New York City mayor Bill de Blasio, notorious for imposing race-based changes directed against the white population in the city, came up with a new agenda.  He is pushing for restricting access of white kids to eight specialized high schools, including Stuyvesant and Bronx School of Science.

The admission to these highly sought after institutions is currently based on a single test called the Specialized High School Admissions Test (SHSAT).  This seems fair enough to any unbiased mind.  No discrimination of any kind against non-white kids is known or registered so far.  But de Blasio, bent as always on attacking the plummeting white population of the Big Apple, is campaigning for replacement of the merit-based schools' entry criteria with offering the school seats to a first-ranked couple of students in each middle school of the city, passing the much simplified standardized statewide test.

Of course, first-ranked students in some of the below average schools of the city would not measure up in their knowledge to even mediocre students in good schools.  Knowing that, why doesn't the NYC mayor work on improving the educational quality of all city schools?  One way to do that would be to require all teachers to pass some well designed test each couple of years.  Why doesn't he promote the value of education to poor communities?  Instead, he is trying to instill a sense of entitlements in the minds of young "minorities" and kill the urge to work hard, compete, and win – the two-century-old cornerstones of achieving success in America.

De Blasio went so far as to state that the SHSAT is "a roadblock to justice and progress."  In reality, subjective criteria designed by de Blasio represent a way to reject some percentage of able-minded and intelligent white kids the right to enter well deserved schools of their choice.  Each seat in these specialized high schools, set aside by what in reality means minority quotas, constitutes a white or Asian kid being discriminated against based just on the color of his skin.  How can the parents of that 15-year-old tell him how fair life is in America?

As if this were not enough, de Blasio announced yet another change.  Beginning in the fall of 2019, the city will set aside 20% of the seats in each specialized school for low-income students coming from the poorest areas of the city, who score just below the cutoff.  Those students would be able to earn their spot by attending a summer session called the Discovery program.  Just by this measure, 20% of mostly white and Asian kids will have to continue their education elsewhere.

For the anti-white mayor of NYC, showering blacks and Latinos with new privileges at the expense of white kids rather than promoting equal opportunities is his way of doing his job.  For the city itself and, by extension, for the entire country, his policies not only mean injustice – they actually mean lowering the bar for the generations ahead in science, education, new technologies, culture, politics, and any other segment of life in America.

New York City mayor Bill de Blasio, notorious for imposing race-based changes directed against the white population in the city, came up with a new agenda.  He is pushing for restricting access of white kids to eight specialized high schools, including Stuyvesant and Bronx School of Science.

The admission to these highly sought after institutions is currently based on a single test called the Specialized High School Admissions Test (SHSAT).  This seems fair enough to any unbiased mind.  No discrimination of any kind against non-white kids is known or registered so far.  But de Blasio, bent as always on attacking the plummeting white population of the Big Apple, is campaigning for replacement of the merit-based schools' entry criteria with offering the school seats to a first-ranked couple of students in each middle school of the city, passing the much simplified standardized statewide test.

Of course, first-ranked students in some of the below average schools of the city would not measure up in their knowledge to even mediocre students in good schools.  Knowing that, why doesn't the NYC mayor work on improving the educational quality of all city schools?  One way to do that would be to require all teachers to pass some well designed test each couple of years.  Why doesn't he promote the value of education to poor communities?  Instead, he is trying to instill a sense of entitlements in the minds of young "minorities" and kill the urge to work hard, compete, and win – the two-century-old cornerstones of achieving success in America.

De Blasio went so far as to state that the SHSAT is "a roadblock to justice and progress."  In reality, subjective criteria designed by de Blasio represent a way to reject some percentage of able-minded and intelligent white kids the right to enter well deserved schools of their choice.  Each seat in these specialized high schools, set aside by what in reality means minority quotas, constitutes a white or Asian kid being discriminated against based just on the color of his skin.  How can the parents of that 15-year-old tell him how fair life is in America?

As if this were not enough, de Blasio announced yet another change.  Beginning in the fall of 2019, the city will set aside 20% of the seats in each specialized school for low-income students coming from the poorest areas of the city, who score just below the cutoff.  Those students would be able to earn their spot by attending a summer session called the Discovery program.  Just by this measure, 20% of mostly white and Asian kids will have to continue their education elsewhere.

For the anti-white mayor of NYC, showering blacks and Latinos with new privileges at the expense of white kids rather than promoting equal opportunities is his way of doing his job.  For the city itself and, by extension, for the entire country, his policies not only mean injustice – they actually mean lowering the bar for the generations ahead in science, education, new technologies, culture, politics, and any other segment of life in America.