Marriage in chaos

In the lifetime of us older guys, the institution of marriage has taken a severe beating.  Easy divorce, premarital cohabitation, out-of-wedlock pregnancy, and same-sex so-called marriage have all thrown the civil institution of marriage and family into chaos, and indeed, into decline.  Many women on welfare, in effect, marry the government.

The latest news item reports that a man is suing a pharmacy for carelessly divulging to his wife that he had purchased Viagra, whereupon marital discord ensued, since he had purposely kept the information from her.

The item reminds me of an incident in which my wife asked me to challenge an item on her specialty credit card (awarded to her, but not to me, as a commercial promotion).  When I called the bank, I was told its employees could not speak to me about my wife's credit card, due to privacy concerns.  I was not amused, and I said to the lady on the line, look: my wife and I shower together.  We don't have privacy from each other.  This fact not only did not persuade the rep; it angered her, and I had to put my wife on the phone.

Anyone who has taken classes to help people begin their own small business is probably familiar with the customary warning – that forming a business partnership is more binding, and more intrusive, than marrying someone.

Sadly, it's true.

Family is the bedrock institution of society.  It is where we learn most of our basic social skills, commitment, and sense of responsibility.  I don't know the statistics, but an enormous percentage of inmates in prison for serious crimes are, as I understand it, from dysfunctional families.

Studies have shown that the ideal situation for a child is to be raised in an intact family, headed by a man and woman who are married to each other and are in love, and who take personal responsibility to provide for their offspring.

Granted, ideals and actuality are often two separate things, but children know the difference between parents who are struggling to achieve the ideal and those who do not care.

As a grandparent, I sincerely fear for the future society in which my grandchildren, more so their grandchildren, will live their lives.

In the lifetime of us older guys, the institution of marriage has taken a severe beating.  Easy divorce, premarital cohabitation, out-of-wedlock pregnancy, and same-sex so-called marriage have all thrown the civil institution of marriage and family into chaos, and indeed, into decline.  Many women on welfare, in effect, marry the government.

The latest news item reports that a man is suing a pharmacy for carelessly divulging to his wife that he had purchased Viagra, whereupon marital discord ensued, since he had purposely kept the information from her.

The item reminds me of an incident in which my wife asked me to challenge an item on her specialty credit card (awarded to her, but not to me, as a commercial promotion).  When I called the bank, I was told its employees could not speak to me about my wife's credit card, due to privacy concerns.  I was not amused, and I said to the lady on the line, look: my wife and I shower together.  We don't have privacy from each other.  This fact not only did not persuade the rep; it angered her, and I had to put my wife on the phone.

Anyone who has taken classes to help people begin their own small business is probably familiar with the customary warning – that forming a business partnership is more binding, and more intrusive, than marrying someone.

Sadly, it's true.

Family is the bedrock institution of society.  It is where we learn most of our basic social skills, commitment, and sense of responsibility.  I don't know the statistics, but an enormous percentage of inmates in prison for serious crimes are, as I understand it, from dysfunctional families.

Studies have shown that the ideal situation for a child is to be raised in an intact family, headed by a man and woman who are married to each other and are in love, and who take personal responsibility to provide for their offspring.

Granted, ideals and actuality are often two separate things, but children know the difference between parents who are struggling to achieve the ideal and those who do not care.

As a grandparent, I sincerely fear for the future society in which my grandchildren, more so their grandchildren, will live their lives.