Turning Virginia blue

A few weeks ago, we watched Democrats take another step toward making Virginia permanently blue.  They had a great turnout and lots of victories, and they set the table for Virginia to go blue in 2020.

We've heard a lot about the growing number of federal employees who live in Virginia.  They are also voting and donating to Democrats in large numbers, as David French wrote:

While there are certainly some biased, partisan conservatives in the federal bureaucracy, the ideological imbalance in the civil service is striking. It's not quite at university-faculty levels, but it's getting close. 

For example, in the 2016 election cycle, Hillary Clinton received an astounding 95 percent of all federal-employee donations. 

Over at the Department of Justice, it is 90%!  The DOJ is where the investigations happen.

Is it unreasonable for people who live in flyover country to be skeptical of lawyers and bureaucrats in a department that donated 90% to Mrs. Clinton?

As French wrote, there is also a terrible danger of groupthink under such circumstances.  It discourages creativity, especially if the person proposing a new idea does not support the favored candidate.

Beyond turning Virginia and most of Maryland's suburbs rather blue, this is a threat to our democracy.

How can a federal bureaucracy be so different from the people it serves?

President Trump won 31 states, or 306 electoral votes. On a county-by-county basis, the U.S. is a red sea with islets of blue.

Shouldn't the bureaucracy reflect some of that vote?  I understand that we've just finished two terms of a very partisan Democrat who used the bureaucracy to go around Congress, from immigration to Obamacare.  I further understand that it will look a bit more balanced after President Trump's (hopefully) two terms.

We've often mentioned that there is a lack of political diversity in our university staffs.  I would argue that the media could use a little political diversity.  Absolutely, the federal bureaucracy would benefit from some diversity as well.

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

A few weeks ago, we watched Democrats take another step toward making Virginia permanently blue.  They had a great turnout and lots of victories, and they set the table for Virginia to go blue in 2020.

We've heard a lot about the growing number of federal employees who live in Virginia.  They are also voting and donating to Democrats in large numbers, as David French wrote:

While there are certainly some biased, partisan conservatives in the federal bureaucracy, the ideological imbalance in the civil service is striking. It's not quite at university-faculty levels, but it's getting close. 

For example, in the 2016 election cycle, Hillary Clinton received an astounding 95 percent of all federal-employee donations. 

Over at the Department of Justice, it is 90%!  The DOJ is where the investigations happen.

Is it unreasonable for people who live in flyover country to be skeptical of lawyers and bureaucrats in a department that donated 90% to Mrs. Clinton?

As French wrote, there is also a terrible danger of groupthink under such circumstances.  It discourages creativity, especially if the person proposing a new idea does not support the favored candidate.

Beyond turning Virginia and most of Maryland's suburbs rather blue, this is a threat to our democracy.

How can a federal bureaucracy be so different from the people it serves?

President Trump won 31 states, or 306 electoral votes. On a county-by-county basis, the U.S. is a red sea with islets of blue.

Shouldn't the bureaucracy reflect some of that vote?  I understand that we've just finished two terms of a very partisan Democrat who used the bureaucracy to go around Congress, from immigration to Obamacare.  I further understand that it will look a bit more balanced after President Trump's (hopefully) two terms.

We've often mentioned that there is a lack of political diversity in our university staffs.  I would argue that the media could use a little political diversity.  Absolutely, the federal bureaucracy would benefit from some diversity as well.

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

RECENT VIDEOS