Perhaps we should get new Republicans

Republicans have campaigned relentlessly against the new health care entitlement forced on America by Democrats and the Obama administration.  Repeal and replace Obamacare was the battle cry as they ran for office over the last four election cycles.  Give us majorities in the House and Senate, and we will repeal the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), they bravely claimed when a presidential veto was assured. 

But now things have changed!  Republicans have majorities in each legislative body and a president who will sign repeal and/or replace legislation.  The only problem is that we have the same unreliable Republicans.  Instead of submitting the previously passed repeal legislation, they have vacillated in indecision.

Based on their recently released proposal, there is a high degree of likelihood that Republicans will retain the health care entitlement with a new funding mechanism (tax credits); retain youths staying on their parents' policies until age 26; reinstate a Cadillac tax on overly generous plans; set up state high risk pools so pre-existing conditions will be covered; and, to make ends meet, likely include the mandatory requirement that all have insurance.  It appears that the ability to purchase insurance across state lines to increase competition, an idea routinely promoted, has once again fallen to the wayside as an apparent sop to the insurance companies.

It appears that the majority of onerous requirements in Obamacare will be retained with one significant difference: it will have a new name, and Republicans, rather than Democrats, should they pass this inadequate legislation, will be blamed for rising insurance rates and health care costs.  Perhaps we should get new Republicans before we get a new health care entitlement.

Republicans have campaigned relentlessly against the new health care entitlement forced on America by Democrats and the Obama administration.  Repeal and replace Obamacare was the battle cry as they ran for office over the last four election cycles.  Give us majorities in the House and Senate, and we will repeal the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), they bravely claimed when a presidential veto was assured. 

But now things have changed!  Republicans have majorities in each legislative body and a president who will sign repeal and/or replace legislation.  The only problem is that we have the same unreliable Republicans.  Instead of submitting the previously passed repeal legislation, they have vacillated in indecision.

Based on their recently released proposal, there is a high degree of likelihood that Republicans will retain the health care entitlement with a new funding mechanism (tax credits); retain youths staying on their parents' policies until age 26; reinstate a Cadillac tax on overly generous plans; set up state high risk pools so pre-existing conditions will be covered; and, to make ends meet, likely include the mandatory requirement that all have insurance.  It appears that the ability to purchase insurance across state lines to increase competition, an idea routinely promoted, has once again fallen to the wayside as an apparent sop to the insurance companies.

It appears that the majority of onerous requirements in Obamacare will be retained with one significant difference: it will have a new name, and Republicans, rather than Democrats, should they pass this inadequate legislation, will be blamed for rising insurance rates and health care costs.  Perhaps we should get new Republicans before we get a new health care entitlement.

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